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#review When it comes to the most expensive restaurants in Amsterdam, Ciel Bleu tops the list with their “Ciel Bleu Caviar” menu priced at a whopping €475, and their other tasting menus come at €195 (Ciel Bleu Experience) and €225 (Ciel Bleu Guestronomy). There’s no way to avoid mentioning it, so I thought I’d get it out of the way early on. Looking for a night of indulgence and pampering with all the bells and whistles? Then head to Ciel Bleu.

The kitchen is run by chef Onno Kokmeijer (since 2003) and his right-hand man Arjan Speelman (since 2008) and Ciel Bleu has held two Michelin stars since 2007.

Their current Guestronomy menu focuses on spices and luxury ingredients, each dish having a spice theme, the spices sometimes playing a supporting role, sometimes used to enhance the ingredients, or sometimes offering extra depth and complexity. Fresh Royal Cabanon oyster, with oyster crème and young cabbage leaves, was cleverly seasoned with a mildly infused szechuan pepper oil. A stunning Carabinero prawn arrived in almond milk spiked with a few drops of pimenton oil and garnished with vermouth-marinated grapes & almonds. Dutch grey shrimps were lacquered with cumin and paired with marinated runner beans, an intense runner bean juice, cauliflower puree & caviar. A visually stunning dish, but unfortunately the cumin flavours were not always perceptible.  Also on the menu tonight was a dish of sweetbreads with a light turmeric coating, a complimentary* pigeon course with a “trappeur” spice blend, and a splendid chocolate (54%), caramel & eggnog dessert with a chocolate & Kahlua sauce. See my September story highlights for photos. * I was recognised 
The cooking was oustanding throughout, showstopper of the night though, was beautifully cooked Dover sole served with capers, a lovage beurre blanc & salsify spiced with Ras El Hanout. Powerful but exceptionally well balanced.

Service was as expected, very accommodating, professional and friendly. The wine list is sensational with a strong selection of Champagne and Bordeaux. There’s something for every palate, although not for every budget; the under €100 options are very limited.

Food: 9
Service: 9.5
Wine list: 9

#review When it comes to the most expensive restaurants in Amsterdam, Ciel Bleu tops the list with their “Ciel Bleu Caviar” menu priced at a whopping €475, and their other tasting menus come at €195 (Ciel Bleu Experience) and €225 (Ciel Bleu Guestronomy). There’s no way to avoid mentioning it, so I thought I’d get it out of the way early on. Looking for a night of indulgence and pampering with all the bells and whistles? Then head to Ciel Bleu.

The kitchen is run by chef Onno Kokmeijer (since 2003) and his right-hand man Arjan Speelman (since 2008) and Ciel Bleu has held two Michelin stars since 2007.

Their current Guestronomy menu focuses on spices and luxury ingredients, each dish having a spice theme, the spices sometimes playing a supporting role, sometimes used to enhance the ingredients, or sometimes offering extra depth and complexity. Fresh Royal Cabanon oyster, with oyster crème and young cabbage leaves, was cleverly seasoned with a mildly infused szechuan pepper oil. A stunning Carabinero prawn arrived in almond milk spiked with a few drops of pimenton oil and garnished with vermouth-marinated grapes & almonds. Dutch grey shrimps were lacquered with cumin and paired with marinated runner beans, an intense runner bean juice, cauliflower puree & caviar. A visually stunning dish, but unfortunately the cumin flavours were not always perceptible. Also on the menu tonight was a dish of sweetbreads with a light turmeric coating, a complimentary* pigeon course with a “trappeur” spice blend, and a splendid chocolate (54%), caramel & eggnog dessert with a chocolate & Kahlua sauce. See my September story highlights for photos. * I was recognised
The cooking was oustanding throughout, showstopper of the night though, was beautifully cooked Dover sole served with capers, a lovage beurre blanc & salsify spiced with Ras El Hanout. Powerful but exceptionally well balanced.

Service was as expected, very accommodating, professional and friendly. The wine list is sensational with a strong selection of Champagne and Bordeaux. There’s something for every palate, although not for every budget; the under €100 options are very limited.

Food: 9
Service: 9.5
Wine list: 9

What’s the most unusual cheese you have tried?

This awesome video by @elizabethonfood shows a 6 month old Mimolette being cut open.

Keep an eye out for our next post where we will share with you what makes this unique French hard cheese look so much like a cantaloupe!

#melbourneandcheese #melbournecheesescene #elizabethonfood

What’s the most unusual cheese you have tried?

This awesome video by @elizabethonfood shows a 6 month old Mimolette being cut open.

Keep an eye out for our next post where we will share with you what makes this unique French hard cheese look so much like a cantaloupe!

#melbourneandcheese #melbournecheesescene #elizabethonfood

Mushroom compote topped with a soft egg yolk covered with a thin layer of mushroom jelly, and accompanied by dots of parsley puree, pan-fried (individually) cep mushrooms, girolle mushrooms and oyster mushrooms, and finished with a delicately creamy cep sauce flavoured with Vin Jaune (see previous posts & stories for more photographs of my meal at the Schwarzwaldstube) #elizabethgermany

Mushroom compote topped with a soft egg yolk covered with a thin layer of mushroom jelly, and accompanied by dots of parsley puree, pan-fried (individually) cep mushrooms, girolle mushrooms and oyster mushrooms, and finished with a delicately creamy cep sauce flavoured with Vin Jaune (see previous posts & stories for more photographs of my meal at the Schwarzwaldstube) #elizabethgermany

Beautiful piece of plancha cooked sea bass with grilled little gem, a light lettuce puree, samphire, cockles, complemented by a foamy pea, mint and yoghurt sauce #elizabethamsterdam #1michelinstar

Beautiful piece of plancha cooked sea bass with grilled little gem, a light lettuce puree, samphire, cockles, complemented by a foamy pea, mint and yoghurt sauce #elizabethamsterdam #1michelinstar

Choux has been part of a restaurant movement that has redefined dining in Amsterdam, a casual dining movement that started around 2013, with restaurants like Rijsel, Gebr. Hartering and Ron Gastrobar, and was joined Daalder, BAK and Choux later on.

I first reviewed @chouxrestaurant in November 2015 (score: 90/100), in the year of the opening, and I have been back a number of times since. My recent meal at Choux (5 courses €52*) shows that the restaurant is on top form. *I was recognised. .
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Chef @merijnvberlo and sommelier @figovanonna, and their respective teams, know what they’re doing and they’re doing it incredibly well. There are many interesting finds on the gradually growing wine list, including a good number of grower champagnes. It has a focus on (well made!) natural wine and it matches the cuisine perfectly. The cuisine is dedicated to the beauty of the season, which, in August, translates into a fresh and floral starter of peas, white currants (fresh & granita), and a codium vinaigrette. As well as a creative dish of plaice, cooked on the bone, with courgette spaghetti, pistachios, chanterelles, green beans, an a stellar creamy confit bergamot sauce. Or an outstanding main course of fillet of roe deer, roe deer steak haché, red orache, smoked Hollandaise, preserved magnolia, polenta croquettes, and roe deer-meadowsweet jus. As was a vegetarian dish of shallots with a creamy koji & horseradish sauce (see my timeline for more details) and a gorgeous blueberry, mud cake, white chocolate-woodruff crème, black currant, and sorrel ice cream dessert. I couldn’t just pick one winner; this was a top-quality meal on all accounts.

Over the years Choux has become a true ambassador for modern Dutch cuisine, not to mention vegetarian cuisine, because Choux illustrates convincingly that vegetable cooking in Amsterdam is, with Copenhagen, among the most creative in Europe.

Food: 9
Service: 9
Wine list: 8.5
#elizabethamsterdam

Choux has been part of a restaurant movement that has redefined dining in Amsterdam, a casual dining movement that started around 2013, with restaurants like Rijsel, Gebr. Hartering and Ron Gastrobar, and was joined Daalder, BAK and Choux later on.

I first reviewed @chouxrestaurant in November 2015 (score: 90/100), in the year of the opening, and I have been back a number of times since. My recent meal at Choux (5 courses €52*) shows that the restaurant is on top form. *I was recognised. .
.
Chef @merijnvberlo and sommelier @figovanonna , and their respective teams, know what they’re doing and they’re doing it incredibly well. There are many interesting finds on the gradually growing wine list, including a good number of grower champagnes. It has a focus on (well made!) natural wine and it matches the cuisine perfectly. The cuisine is dedicated to the beauty of the season, which, in August, translates into a fresh and floral starter of peas, white currants (fresh & granita), and a codium vinaigrette. As well as a creative dish of plaice, cooked on the bone, with courgette spaghetti, pistachios, chanterelles, green beans, an a stellar creamy confit bergamot sauce. Or an outstanding main course of fillet of roe deer, roe deer steak haché, red orache, smoked Hollandaise, preserved magnolia, polenta croquettes, and roe deer-meadowsweet jus. As was a vegetarian dish of shallots with a creamy koji & horseradish sauce (see my timeline for more details) and a gorgeous blueberry, mud cake, white chocolate-woodruff crème, black currant, and sorrel ice cream dessert. I couldn’t just pick one winner; this was a top-quality meal on all accounts.

Over the years Choux has become a true ambassador for modern Dutch cuisine, not to mention vegetarian cuisine, because Choux illustrates convincingly that vegetable cooking in Amsterdam is, with Copenhagen, among the most creative in Europe.

Food: 9
Service: 9
Wine list: 8.5
#elizabethamsterdam

During my years as a blogger, I visited 80+ 3-star restaurants in Europe, US and Japan. A frequently asked question was: what makes a 3-star dish? To me the four fundamentals of a great dish are: intensity, definition, complexity, and harmony.

Intensity: the right level of flavour intensity for the ingredients used, but also depth of flavour, profoundness.

Definition: the distinctiveness of individual flavours and ingredients in the dish and the precision of their delivery.

Complexity: the right number of ingredients and flavours for the dish, but also techniques used and seasoning in the broadest sense of the word.

Harmony: the ingredients and flavours work together and deliver a coherent experience. Contrast is also a form of harmony.

So how did Spectrum do? Since the opening in 2014, Restaurant Spectrum (formerly Librije’s Zusje) has always been an outstanding 2-star restaurant, consistently delivering high-quality meals and stellar service.
On every occasion executive chef Sidney Schutte produced exceptional plates of food with imaginative, often highly unusual flavour combinations with cutting-edge flavours, dishes with a unique character. But with the new name (since January 2019) and a brand-new decor, there’s a new dynamic in the restaurant and on the plate. During my recent meal at Spectrum I found that Schutte has taken things to the highest level and the food was nothing short of extraordinary. Overall it was a 3-star meal with dazzlingly inventive dishes that worked beautifully. Service was impeccable as ever. Restaurant manager Sascha Speckemeier runs a tight ship with an enthusiastic team; the attention to detail is exquisite.

In my previous blogging scoring system I’d score this meal 97 points, which translates to a 10 in my new scoring system. *I was recognised and received 1 complimentary dish

Food: 10
Service: 10
Wine list: 8 (reassuringly expensive)

Photo: lightly smoked langoustine (beautiful off-raw texture), nasturtium sauce, and a crisp floral sphere with a sensational filling of crunchy quinoa, bulgur, cockles, razor clams & lemon verbena crème
(More photos to follow!)

During my years as a blogger, I visited 80+ 3-star restaurants in Europe, US and Japan. A frequently asked question was: what makes a 3-star dish? To me the four fundamentals of a great dish are: intensity, definition, complexity, and harmony.

Intensity: the right level of flavour intensity for the ingredients used, but also depth of flavour, profoundness.

Definition: the distinctiveness of individual flavours and ingredients in the dish and the precision of their delivery.

Complexity: the right number of ingredients and flavours for the dish, but also techniques used and seasoning in the broadest sense of the word.

Harmony: the ingredients and flavours work together and deliver a coherent experience. Contrast is also a form of harmony.

So how did Spectrum do? Since the opening in 2014, Restaurant Spectrum (formerly Librije’s Zusje) has always been an outstanding 2-star restaurant, consistently delivering high-quality meals and stellar service.
On every occasion executive chef Sidney Schutte produced exceptional plates of food with imaginative, often highly unusual flavour combinations with cutting-edge flavours, dishes with a unique character. But with the new name (since January 2019) and a brand-new decor, there’s a new dynamic in the restaurant and on the plate. During my recent meal at Spectrum I found that Schutte has taken things to the highest level and the food was nothing short of extraordinary. Overall it was a 3-star meal with dazzlingly inventive dishes that worked beautifully. Service was impeccable as ever. Restaurant manager Sascha Speckemeier runs a tight ship with an enthusiastic team; the attention to detail is exquisite.

In my previous blogging scoring system I’d score this meal 97 points, which translates to a 10 in my new scoring system. *I was recognised and received 1 complimentary dish

Food: 10
Service: 10
Wine list: 8 (reassuringly expensive)

Photo: lightly smoked langoustine (beautiful off-raw texture), nasturtium sauce, and a crisp floral sphere with a sensational filling of crunchy quinoa, bulgur, cockles, razor clams & lemon verbena crème
(More photos to follow!)

Tomato tartare topped with a mixture of finely chopped cucumber and green pepper, and basil crème #elizabethamsterdam

Tomato tartare topped with a mixture of finely chopped cucumber and green pepper, and basil crème #elizabethamsterdam

Squid (sepia) lacquered with coffee jus, and served with periwinkles, mango, and a cardamom sauce. Utterly brilliant, just look at it! See previous post for my review. #elizabethamsterdam

Squid (sepia) lacquered with coffee jus, and served with periwinkles, mango, and a cardamom sauce. Utterly brilliant, just look at it! See previous post for my review. #elizabethamsterdam

Most Recent

#toreviewornottoreview When it comes to new restaurants I’m not in any way hungry to get there first. I think it’s only fair to give a restaurant time to settle in. Usually I leave it for a couple of weeks or even months. But in this case I couldn’t resist. Bambino is a bar/restaurant by the people from BAK, and it’s arguably the most exciting opening of the year. The place is wittily named after the Bambino character in the famous Bud Spencer and Terence Hill spaghetti westerns.

I was having lunch in the area and I knew that @bambino_bar was only a 9 minute walk. I could always walk by to see how it looked, right? And if I only have 2 small courses for lunch, I will still have room for a small 2nd lunch, no?

The compact menu features appetisers, 4 cold (€10-€13) & 4 warm dishes (€10-€24), and desserts (€7-€8). * I was recognised and the mozzarella and both desserts were complimentary

We started with some sourdough, which is baked at BAK and a half a ball of Dutch mozzarella. Next up was lightly salt-cured mullet with fresh horseradish & tarragon oil, followed by a dish of snappy green cauliflower, radish, sunflower seeds & salty whipped feta. Then we had creamy arroz rice flavoured with a rich shore crab stock, garnished with chicory leaves which doubled as little spoons. Best of all though, was a brilliant pork rib chop (Baambrugge pig) rubbed with black garlic, simply served with a dark, umami-rich bagna cauda, and a green salad.  Desserts were campari sorbet with fresh grapefruit and olive oil, and gorgeous ice cream puffs covered with a warm chocolate sauce. All dishes were shared.

So much for a small 2nd lunch, but this is the kind of food that puts a smile on my face. Deliciousness all around. Well-thought out, ungimmicky dishes with attracive flavours. And to think they’ve only been open for 5 days. Too early to score, but certainly an 8 for the Bud Spencer glasses (see stories)! .
.
Will post more photographs, but for now I’ll give you the pork chop!
#elizabethamsterdam

#toreviewornottoreview When it comes to new restaurants I’m not in any way hungry to get there first. I think it’s only fair to give a restaurant time to settle in. Usually I leave it for a couple of weeks or even months. But in this case I couldn’t resist. Bambino is a bar/restaurant by the people from BAK, and it’s arguably the most exciting opening of the year. The place is wittily named after the Bambino character in the famous Bud Spencer and Terence Hill spaghetti westerns.

I was having lunch in the area and I knew that @bambino_bar was only a 9 minute walk. I could always walk by to see how it looked, right? And if I only have 2 small courses for lunch, I will still have room for a small 2nd lunch, no?

The compact menu features appetisers, 4 cold (€10-€13) & 4 warm dishes (€10-€24), and desserts (€7-€8). * I was recognised and the mozzarella and both desserts were complimentary

We started with some sourdough, which is baked at BAK and a half a ball of Dutch mozzarella. Next up was lightly salt-cured mullet with fresh horseradish & tarragon oil, followed by a dish of snappy green cauliflower, radish, sunflower seeds & salty whipped feta. Then we had creamy arroz rice flavoured with a rich shore crab stock, garnished with chicory leaves which doubled as little spoons. Best of all though, was a brilliant pork rib chop (Baambrugge pig) rubbed with black garlic, simply served with a dark, umami-rich bagna cauda, and a green salad. Desserts were campari sorbet with fresh grapefruit and olive oil, and gorgeous ice cream puffs covered with a warm chocolate sauce. All dishes were shared.

So much for a small 2nd lunch, but this is the kind of food that puts a smile on my face. Deliciousness all around. Well-thought out, ungimmicky dishes with attracive flavours. And to think they’ve only been open for 5 days. Too early to score, but certainly an 8 for the Bud Spencer glasses (see stories)! .
.
Will post more photographs, but for now I’ll give you the pork chop!
#elizabethamsterdam

#review When it comes to the most expensive restaurants in Amsterdam, Ciel Bleu tops the list with their “Ciel Bleu Caviar” menu priced at a whopping €475, and their other tasting menus come at €195 (Ciel Bleu Experience) and €225 (Ciel Bleu Guestronomy). There’s no way to avoid mentioning it, so I thought I’d get it out of the way early on. Looking for a night of indulgence and pampering with all the bells and whistles? Then head to Ciel Bleu.

The kitchen is run by chef Onno Kokmeijer (since 2003) and his right-hand man Arjan Speelman (since 2008) and Ciel Bleu has held two Michelin stars since 2007.

Their current Guestronomy menu focuses on spices and luxury ingredients, each dish having a spice theme, the spices sometimes playing a supporting role, sometimes used to enhance the ingredients, or sometimes offering extra depth and complexity. Fresh Royal Cabanon oyster, with oyster crème and young cabbage leaves, was cleverly seasoned with a mildly infused szechuan pepper oil. A stunning Carabinero prawn arrived in almond milk spiked with a few drops of pimenton oil and garnished with vermouth-marinated grapes & almonds. Dutch grey shrimps were lacquered with cumin and paired with marinated runner beans, an intense runner bean juice, cauliflower puree & caviar. A visually stunning dish, but unfortunately the cumin flavours were not always perceptible.  Also on the menu tonight was a dish of sweetbreads with a light turmeric coating, a complimentary* pigeon course with a “trappeur” spice blend, and a splendid chocolate (54%), caramel & eggnog dessert with a chocolate & Kahlua sauce. See my September story highlights for photos. * I was recognised 
The cooking was oustanding throughout, showstopper of the night though, was beautifully cooked Dover sole served with capers, a lovage beurre blanc & salsify spiced with Ras El Hanout. Powerful but exceptionally well balanced.

Service was as expected, very accommodating, professional and friendly. The wine list is sensational with a strong selection of Champagne and Bordeaux. There’s something for every palate, although not for every budget; the under €100 options are very limited.

Food: 9
Service: 9.5
Wine list: 9

#review When it comes to the most expensive restaurants in Amsterdam, Ciel Bleu tops the list with their “Ciel Bleu Caviar” menu priced at a whopping €475, and their other tasting menus come at €195 (Ciel Bleu Experience) and €225 (Ciel Bleu Guestronomy). There’s no way to avoid mentioning it, so I thought I’d get it out of the way early on. Looking for a night of indulgence and pampering with all the bells and whistles? Then head to Ciel Bleu.

The kitchen is run by chef Onno Kokmeijer (since 2003) and his right-hand man Arjan Speelman (since 2008) and Ciel Bleu has held two Michelin stars since 2007.

Their current Guestronomy menu focuses on spices and luxury ingredients, each dish having a spice theme, the spices sometimes playing a supporting role, sometimes used to enhance the ingredients, or sometimes offering extra depth and complexity. Fresh Royal Cabanon oyster, with oyster crème and young cabbage leaves, was cleverly seasoned with a mildly infused szechuan pepper oil. A stunning Carabinero prawn arrived in almond milk spiked with a few drops of pimenton oil and garnished with vermouth-marinated grapes & almonds. Dutch grey shrimps were lacquered with cumin and paired with marinated runner beans, an intense runner bean juice, cauliflower puree & caviar. A visually stunning dish, but unfortunately the cumin flavours were not always perceptible. Also on the menu tonight was a dish of sweetbreads with a light turmeric coating, a complimentary* pigeon course with a “trappeur” spice blend, and a splendid chocolate (54%), caramel & eggnog dessert with a chocolate & Kahlua sauce. See my September story highlights for photos. * I was recognised
The cooking was oustanding throughout, showstopper of the night though, was beautifully cooked Dover sole served with capers, a lovage beurre blanc & salsify spiced with Ras El Hanout. Powerful but exceptionally well balanced.

Service was as expected, very accommodating, professional and friendly. The wine list is sensational with a strong selection of Champagne and Bordeaux. There’s something for every palate, although not for every budget; the under €100 options are very limited.

Food: 9
Service: 9.5
Wine list: 9

#review EN Japanese Kitchen & Sake bar was opened by Ken Osawa (chef) and Ryuji Ikemizu (front of house) in 2015. Both previously worked at Yamazato (1 Michelin star) in the Okura hotel in Amsterdam.  EN offers an la carte menu with a large selection of hot & cold starters and mains, as well as sashimi, sushi rolls, and nigiri sushi. Also an offer is EN’s signature Kappo-style seasonal tasting menu. Kappo is a cuisine often described as something between Kaiseki and Izakaya.

Both the sashimi and sushi are of excellent quality here. On a recent visit* I ordered 4 nigiri sushi: saba (mackerel, €5.50), tai (seabream, €6), unagi (eel, €7, and otoro (fatty tuna, €11). Followed by EN’s beautifully presented and expertly cut (sometimes wafer-thin) “Sashimi Matsu” (€49.50), 10 types of sashimi, including hamachi (yellowtail), akami (lean tuna), otoro, ebi (sweet shrimps), and ika (squid), and served with the appropriate condiments such as wasabi, warashi-negi (finely sliced green onion), and momiji-oroshi (a spicy mixture of radish & dried red chillies). To conclude my meal I had the beef teriyaki, which was lovely. (*early September 2019, see September story highlights)

Not so excellent was the pacing of the meal. The restaurant has around 20 seats, including 6 bar seats. On a busy night this can be a logistic nightmare, especially when ordering sashimi and sushi, because there’s only chef Ken Osawa preparing everyone’s sashimi and sushi orders. I had to wait for almost an hour before my nigiri arrived. However, the quality was worth the wait.

The wine list is small but their great sake selection makes up for this.

Food: 8
Service: 6
Wine/Sake list: 7
#elizabethamsterdam

#review EN Japanese Kitchen & Sake bar was opened by Ken Osawa (chef) and Ryuji Ikemizu (front of house) in 2015. Both previously worked at Yamazato (1 Michelin star) in the Okura hotel in Amsterdam. EN offers an la carte menu with a large selection of hot & cold starters and mains, as well as sashimi, sushi rolls, and nigiri sushi. Also an offer is EN’s signature Kappo-style seasonal tasting menu. Kappo is a cuisine often described as something between Kaiseki and Izakaya.

Both the sashimi and sushi are of excellent quality here. On a recent visit* I ordered 4 nigiri sushi: saba (mackerel, €5.50), tai (seabream, €6), unagi (eel, €7, and otoro (fatty tuna, €11). Followed by EN’s beautifully presented and expertly cut (sometimes wafer-thin) “Sashimi Matsu” (€49.50), 10 types of sashimi, including hamachi (yellowtail), akami (lean tuna), otoro, ebi (sweet shrimps), and ika (squid), and served with the appropriate condiments such as wasabi, warashi-negi (finely sliced green onion), and momiji-oroshi (a spicy mixture of radish & dried red chillies). To conclude my meal I had the beef teriyaki, which was lovely. (*early September 2019, see September story highlights)

Not so excellent was the pacing of the meal. The restaurant has around 20 seats, including 6 bar seats. On a busy night this can be a logistic nightmare, especially when ordering sashimi and sushi, because there’s only chef Ken Osawa preparing everyone’s sashimi and sushi orders. I had to wait for almost an hour before my nigiri arrived. However, the quality was worth the wait.

The wine list is small but their great sake selection makes up for this.

Food: 8
Service: 6
Wine/Sake list: 7
#elizabethamsterdam

Chicken, morel mushrooms, grelot onions, and potato mousseline @ Zoldering in Amsterdam #elizabethamsterdam

Chicken, morel mushrooms, grelot onions, and potato mousseline @ Zoldering in Amsterdam #elizabethamsterdam

Amsterdam’s 38 essential restaurants/eats, freshly updated by me for @eater. The dining scene in Amsterdam has changed dramatically in the last decade. In this latest roundup of Amsterdam’s essential eats, you’ll find timeless favourites and luxury options, but this list also reflects the ways Amsterdam’s dining scene has come of age with innovative restaurants like Café Modern, Choux, BAK, Daalder and Bar Alt. It features restaurants all over town, including in lesser-known parts of Amsterdam, and some great bars to explore Amsterdam’s craft beer scene. Browse the full list on www.eater.com (link in bio). Please note that the list is in geographical order. Enjoy!#elizabethamsterdam

Amsterdam’s 38 essential restaurants/eats, freshly updated by me for @eater . The dining scene in Amsterdam has changed dramatically in the last decade. In this latest roundup of Amsterdam’s essential eats, you’ll find timeless favourites and luxury options, but this list also reflects the ways Amsterdam’s dining scene has come of age with innovative restaurants like Café Modern, Choux, BAK, Daalder and Bar Alt. It features restaurants all over town, including in lesser-known parts of Amsterdam, and some great bars to explore Amsterdam’s craft beer scene. Browse the full list on www.eater.com (link in bio). Please note that the list is in geographical order. Enjoy! #elizabethamsterdam

Roasted cauliflower with almond mole @ FC Hyena in Amsterdam. Insanely delicious. #elizabethamsterdam

Roasted cauliflower with almond mole @ FC Hyena in Amsterdam. Insanely delicious. #elizabethamsterdam

#review Vuurtoreneiland (lighthouse island) was artificially created in 1701 to serve as a site for a lighthouse but also as part of the famous Defence Line of Amsterdam, a Unesco world heritage site. Since 2015 the island has had a restaurant, with a glass house as their summer residence, and a winter residence in the island’s historic fort. A meal at Vuurtoreneiland is priced at € 90, and this includes aperitif, a 5-course menu, coffee/tea, and a return boat trip. Full disclosure: Vuurtoreneiland is always fully booked, so I had to pull some strings to get in (thank you @jorisbijdendijk)
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The boat trip from Amsterdam’s eastern docklands to Vuurtoreneiland takes about one hour. On board we were served the aperitif and some traditional Dutch snacks, such as “Ossenworst”, cheese & gherkins.

Once we arrived there was plenty of time to wander around the island (including the wine cellar), before the actual meal started. Appetisers today included a corn taco with fermented lentils, local “Skeapsrond” cheese & smoked egg yolk.

Next up were cabbage leaves, lightly coated with oyster crème, toasted buckwheat & dill dressing, followed by halibut with smoked eel beurre blanc, cucumber & sea lettuce, and Duroc porc (belly, neck & sausage). Finally there was a raspberry, yoghurt cream, crumble & sorrel dessert. Coffee and biscuits were served on the boat back to Amsterdam.

Service was friendly and relaxed throughout and the wine list is fun, inspired and affordable. The food at Vuurtoreneiland is on the rustic side, but delicious and with inspired use of seasonal and local ingredients. It’s very much in sync with its surroundings and please do note that the island has no running water or electricity.  Stand out dish was the halibut: beautifully cooked with a lovely smokiness to it. Vuurtoreneiland is absolutely worth a visit, the entire experience was amazing, but food wise I feel there’s some untapped potential here to be explored. I do realise however that this would probably mean a price hike.

Food: 7 (9 for the entire experience)
Service: 8
Wine list: 8
#elizabethamsterdam (ps see story highlights for more photographs of the food and the island)

#review Vuurtoreneiland (lighthouse island) was artificially created in 1701 to serve as a site for a lighthouse but also as part of the famous Defence Line of Amsterdam, a Unesco world heritage site. Since 2015 the island has had a restaurant, with a glass house as their summer residence, and a winter residence in the island’s historic fort. A meal at Vuurtoreneiland is priced at € 90, and this includes aperitif, a 5-course menu, coffee/tea, and a return boat trip. Full disclosure: Vuurtoreneiland is always fully booked, so I had to pull some strings to get in (thank you @jorisbijdendijk )
.
.
The boat trip from Amsterdam’s eastern docklands to Vuurtoreneiland takes about one hour. On board we were served the aperitif and some traditional Dutch snacks, such as “Ossenworst”, cheese & gherkins.

Once we arrived there was plenty of time to wander around the island (including the wine cellar), before the actual meal started. Appetisers today included a corn taco with fermented lentils, local “Skeapsrond” cheese & smoked egg yolk.

Next up were cabbage leaves, lightly coated with oyster crème, toasted buckwheat & dill dressing, followed by halibut with smoked eel beurre blanc, cucumber & sea lettuce, and Duroc porc (belly, neck & sausage). Finally there was a raspberry, yoghurt cream, crumble & sorrel dessert. Coffee and biscuits were served on the boat back to Amsterdam.

Service was friendly and relaxed throughout and the wine list is fun, inspired and affordable. The food at Vuurtoreneiland is on the rustic side, but delicious and with inspired use of seasonal and local ingredients. It’s very much in sync with its surroundings and please do note that the island has no running water or electricity. Stand out dish was the halibut: beautifully cooked with a lovely smokiness to it. Vuurtoreneiland is absolutely worth a visit, the entire experience was amazing, but food wise I feel there’s some untapped potential here to be explored. I do realise however that this would probably mean a price hike.

Food: 7 (9 for the entire experience)
Service: 8
Wine list: 8
#elizabethamsterdam (ps see story highlights for more photographs of the food and the island)

#review Balthazar’s Keuken (keuken is Dutch for kitchen) is a tiny, narrow restaurant run by the Parry family since 1995. Each meal starts with a nicely presented selection of appetisers. We had brioche toast with sauerkraut and wild goose pastrami, razor clams with green tomato, almonds and Noilly Prat, cep mushroom “ceviche” with chorizo, and cherry clafoutis with blue cheese. For the main course there was a choice of meat or fish, I went for the latter: seabass with Dutch grey shrimps, gnocchi, a light shrimp bisque, roasted chicory, and some grapefruit “crumble”. Dessert was panna cotta with bergamot, pistachio crumbs, fresh raspberries and a raspberry snap.

Balthazar’s Keuken is not necessarily the best in its category, the main appeal of  this restaurant is the relaxed and informal approach to dining. They offer nice and tasty dishes at affordable prices, the set 3-course menu is priced at €37.50. It’s a fun restaurant, the food however, is more like home cooking than proper restaurant food.

Food: 6.5
Service: 7 (friendly and well-paced)
Winelist: 6.5 (a bit basic with limited choice) 
#elizabethamsterdam

#review Balthazar’s Keuken (keuken is Dutch for kitchen) is a tiny, narrow restaurant run by the Parry family since 1995. Each meal starts with a nicely presented selection of appetisers. We had brioche toast with sauerkraut and wild goose pastrami, razor clams with green tomato, almonds and Noilly Prat, cep mushroom “ceviche” with chorizo, and cherry clafoutis with blue cheese. For the main course there was a choice of meat or fish, I went for the latter: seabass with Dutch grey shrimps, gnocchi, a light shrimp bisque, roasted chicory, and some grapefruit “crumble”. Dessert was panna cotta with bergamot, pistachio crumbs, fresh raspberries and a raspberry snap.

Balthazar’s Keuken is not necessarily the best in its category, the main appeal of  this restaurant is the relaxed and informal approach to dining. They offer nice and tasty dishes at affordable prices, the set 3-course menu is priced at €37.50. It’s a fun restaurant, the food however, is more like home cooking than proper restaurant food.

Food: 6.5
Service: 7 (friendly and well-paced)
Winelist: 6.5 (a bit basic with limited choice)
#elizabethamsterdam

Scallops with garlic and glass noodles at Full Moon Garden in Amsterdam. I’m no expert on Cantonese cuisine, but the quality of the food at Full Moon is definitely a step up from the other Cantonese restaurants I’ve tried in Amsterdam. The Hong Kong BBQ (Siu Mei) dishes (see stories) were terrific, particularly the char siu and the crispy pork belly, and the dim sum is in a league of its own (also see stories), the best I’ve found so far in Amsterdam (sorry Oriental City) #elizabethamsterdam

Scallops with garlic and glass noodles at Full Moon Garden in Amsterdam. I’m no expert on Cantonese cuisine, but the quality of the food at Full Moon is definitely a step up from the other Cantonese restaurants I’ve tried in Amsterdam. The Hong Kong BBQ (Siu Mei) dishes (see stories) were terrific, particularly the char siu and the crispy pork belly, and the dim sum is in a league of its own (also see stories), the best I’ve found so far in Amsterdam (sorry Oriental City) #elizabethamsterdam

Roasted pointed cabbage with a creamy fish and fermented asparagus sauce. Unfussy but utterly delicious #elizabethamsterdam

Roasted pointed cabbage with a creamy fish and fermented asparagus sauce. Unfussy but utterly delicious #elizabethamsterdam

Throwback to last Friday: Squid ink and celeriac cylinder with king crab, beurre blanc ice cream and Baerii caviar. A signature dish of 2-star Ciel Bleu in Amsterdam, a smaller version is now served as an appetiser. Glad to see it’s still on the menu #elizabethamsterdam #2michelinstars

Throwback to last Friday: Squid ink and celeriac cylinder with king crab, beurre blanc ice cream and Baerii caviar. A signature dish of 2-star Ciel Bleu in Amsterdam, a smaller version is now served as an appetiser. Glad to see it’s still on the menu #elizabethamsterdam #2michelinstars

#review Taiko is a “modern Asian inspired” restaurant at the five star Conservatorium Hotel in Amsterdam, occupying the space that originally housed Tunes restaurant. Tunes was relaunched as Taiko 5 years ago and chef Schilo van Coevorden is still the executive chef. The menu offers dishes like sushi/sashimi and dim sum, but also includes Taiko’s signature Bresse chicken, various types/grades of Japanese Wagyu, and there are two tasting menus: Omakase (€125, ± 8 courses) and Taiko Vegan (€78, ±8 courses). .
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I had the Omakase menu, which featured a number of top quality ingredients. There was farmed Dutch yellowtail from the province of Zeeland (various preparations/cuts), bluefin tuna (otoro tartare with caviar loosely wrapped in nori & slow-cooked tuna in a jellied broth with homemade tofu and trumpet mushrooms). As Bresse chicken (Hainanese poached breast & Korean fried thigh) and Gunma Wagyu A5 (braised “sucade” (flat iron steak) & gyoza, raw with oyster, and tartare). All well-prepared and attractively presented dishes, although in some cases, particularly with the chicken and wagyu, I didn’t really see the point of using such premium ingredients. Altogether I found the preparations were too much fanfare for this quality of produce.

Stand out dish was the “Snail Jungle Curry”, a wonderfully elegant take on a jungle curry, with snails, Dutch grey shrimps, and pumpkin.

The wine list was your typical hotel wine list, a little bit of everything, with sometimes huge mark-ups, e.g. Pontet-Canet 2013 at €435, which is more than five times retail. Service was friendly but erratic, especially when it came to introducing the dishes. Not every member of staff was familiar with the details of the dishes, resulting in cryptic or incomplete descriptions.

On the whole my meal at Taiko was an enjoyable experience, but the performance, both on the plate and in the room, failed to justify the hefty price tag.

Food: 7
Service: 7
Wine list: 7
#elizabethamsterdam (see September Amsterdam story highlights for more photos)

#review Taiko is a “modern Asian inspired” restaurant at the five star Conservatorium Hotel in Amsterdam, occupying the space that originally housed Tunes restaurant. Tunes was relaunched as Taiko 5 years ago and chef Schilo van Coevorden is still the executive chef. The menu offers dishes like sushi/sashimi and dim sum, but also includes Taiko’s signature Bresse chicken, various types/grades of Japanese Wagyu, and there are two tasting menus: Omakase (€125, ± 8 courses) and Taiko Vegan (€78, ±8 courses). .
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I had the Omakase menu, which featured a number of top quality ingredients. There was farmed Dutch yellowtail from the province of Zeeland (various preparations/cuts), bluefin tuna (otoro tartare with caviar loosely wrapped in nori & slow-cooked tuna in a jellied broth with homemade tofu and trumpet mushrooms). As Bresse chicken (Hainanese poached breast & Korean fried thigh) and Gunma Wagyu A5 (braised “sucade” (flat iron steak) & gyoza, raw with oyster, and tartare). All well-prepared and attractively presented dishes, although in some cases, particularly with the chicken and wagyu, I didn’t really see the point of using such premium ingredients. Altogether I found the preparations were too much fanfare for this quality of produce.

Stand out dish was the “Snail Jungle Curry”, a wonderfully elegant take on a jungle curry, with snails, Dutch grey shrimps, and pumpkin.

The wine list was your typical hotel wine list, a little bit of everything, with sometimes huge mark-ups, e.g. Pontet-Canet 2013 at €435, which is more than five times retail. Service was friendly but erratic, especially when it came to introducing the dishes. Not every member of staff was familiar with the details of the dishes, resulting in cryptic or incomplete descriptions.

On the whole my meal at Taiko was an enjoyable experience, but the performance, both on the plate and in the room, failed to justify the hefty price tag.

Food: 7
Service: 7
Wine list: 7
#elizabethamsterdam (see September Amsterdam story highlights for more photos)

Men Impossible is an 18-seat restaurant serving vegan ramen in Amsterdam’s lovely Jordaan neighbourhood, a one-man operation run by Atsushi Ishida. After its opening in 2017 Men Impossible initially served Tsukemen (dipping ramen), but Atsushi now serves vegan Abura soba (no broth ramen aka oil noodles). However, he serves them with spelt noodles instead of buckwheat and it comes in three flavours: black garlic oil, super garlic and red chilli oil. Toppings include fresh sweet corn, spring onions, fried onions, and poppy seeds. Also on offer is a selection of vegan snacks/appetisers.

I went for the black garlic oil, which, once mixed with the base sauce (Tare), the noodles and the toppings, delivered an intense savoury, umami-rich flavour experience. The concentrated sauce was wonderfully creamy and rich, offering a similar, pleasing texture as you would experience with an egg.

With the exception of the vegan ‘Kapsalon’ at the Vegan Junk Food Bar, ‘satisfying’ and ‘hearty’ are two words I don’t usually associate with vegan food, but this was exactly that and I’d score it a 7/10. #elizabethamsterdam

Men Impossible is an 18-seat restaurant serving vegan ramen in Amsterdam’s lovely Jordaan neighbourhood, a one-man operation run by Atsushi Ishida. After its opening in 2017 Men Impossible initially served Tsukemen (dipping ramen), but Atsushi now serves vegan Abura soba (no broth ramen aka oil noodles). However, he serves them with spelt noodles instead of buckwheat and it comes in three flavours: black garlic oil, super garlic and red chilli oil. Toppings include fresh sweet corn, spring onions, fried onions, and poppy seeds. Also on offer is a selection of vegan snacks/appetisers.

I went for the black garlic oil, which, once mixed with the base sauce (Tare), the noodles and the toppings, delivered an intense savoury, umami-rich flavour experience. The concentrated sauce was wonderfully creamy and rich, offering a similar, pleasing texture as you would experience with an egg.

With the exception of the vegan ‘Kapsalon’ at the Vegan Junk Food Bar, ‘satisfying’ and ‘hearty’ are two words I don’t usually associate with vegan food, but this was exactly that and I’d score it a 7/10. #elizabethamsterdam

There’s unique, and there’s unique. Vuurtoreneiland gets my vote for the most unique dining location in Amsterdam. #elizabethamsterdam

There’s unique, and there’s unique. Vuurtoreneiland gets my vote for the most unique dining location in Amsterdam. #elizabethamsterdam

It’s time for another Amsterdam burger review.  This time I tried the “Lombardo’s Black Wagyu signature burger” (black wagyu patty, cheddar cheese, pancetta, tomato, homemade burger sauce and pickles) at Lombardo’s and the “Classic Beef Thriller” (Dutch dairy cow patty, Gouda cheese, bacon, red onion and Thriller sauce) with an extra patty at Thrill Grill (Gerard Douplein branch). .
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Lombardo’s is an established player on the Amsterdam burger scene (since 2010), but this was my first visit. The patty (cooked medium rare) of the Black Wagyu burger (€19.90) at Lombardo’s was pretty good, with good quality meat, black wagyu referring to a blend of Japanese wagyu and black angus, delivering a rich and juicy patty, with a tender texture. Two let downs though were the bun, which was too big compared to the size of the patty, and the burger sauce failed to complement the meat. The sauce was nice on its own, but didn’t have enough punch for this rich, full-bodied burger. (score: 3.5/5)

Thrill Grill is the brainchild of former Michelin starred chef Robert Kranenborg. It originally started out as a pop-up restaurant in 2014, but now it has two branches in Amsterdam and one in Haarlem.  I went for my usual, the Classic Beef Thriller, but this time with an extra patty (€14.45). Let me start, that the double patty was a mistake, because the Classic is splendidly built as it is: a thick and juicy pub-style patty, cooked medium-rare, with a nice coarse texture, topped with melting Gouda, crispy bacon, a thin slice of tomato, lettuce, served on a toasted bun with a pickle on the side. A neat and pretty burger, each bite well-balanced, but with a double patty this gets lost, so in the end I finished the burger with just one patty. (score: 4.5/5 single patty, 3.5/5 double patty)

It’s time for another Amsterdam burger review. This time I tried the “Lombardo’s Black Wagyu signature burger” (black wagyu patty, cheddar cheese, pancetta, tomato, homemade burger sauce and pickles) at Lombardo’s and the “Classic Beef Thriller” (Dutch dairy cow patty, Gouda cheese, bacon, red onion and Thriller sauce) with an extra patty at Thrill Grill (Gerard Douplein branch). .
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Lombardo’s is an established player on the Amsterdam burger scene (since 2010), but this was my first visit. The patty (cooked medium rare) of the Black Wagyu burger (€19.90) at Lombardo’s was pretty good, with good quality meat, black wagyu referring to a blend of Japanese wagyu and black angus, delivering a rich and juicy patty, with a tender texture. Two let downs though were the bun, which was too big compared to the size of the patty, and the burger sauce failed to complement the meat. The sauce was nice on its own, but didn’t have enough punch for this rich, full-bodied burger. (score: 3.5/5)

Thrill Grill is the brainchild of former Michelin starred chef Robert Kranenborg. It originally started out as a pop-up restaurant in 2014, but now it has two branches in Amsterdam and one in Haarlem. I went for my usual, the Classic Beef Thriller, but this time with an extra patty (€14.45). Let me start, that the double patty was a mistake, because the Classic is splendidly built as it is: a thick and juicy pub-style patty, cooked medium-rare, with a nice coarse texture, topped with melting Gouda, crispy bacon, a thin slice of tomato, lettuce, served on a toasted bun with a pickle on the side. A neat and pretty burger, each bite well-balanced, but with a double patty this gets lost, so in the end I finished the burger with just one patty. (score: 4.5/5 single patty, 3.5/5 double patty)

#review Whenever I’m craving seafood, Stork in Amsterdam is my go to place, but this time I wanted to try something new, so I went to Brut de Mer. Brut de Mer is a cozy seafood bar, opened on the lively Gerard Dou square in Amsterdam in 2015. I must have passed this place hundreds of times, always thinking I must go there soon.

So, there I was,  lunch on a Friday afternoon in August, starting of with an oyster tasting (€39 for two). Brut de Mer offers a number of varieties, today including some fresh and salty Fine de Claire (Favier), creamy and round  Les Jolies, meaty and beautifully sweet Cromane, very plump and vegetal Tsarskaya, fleshy and briny Imperatrice, and finally some lovely mineral,  meaty, and gently sweet Gillardeau.

Next we each had a full-flavoured mini lobster bisque served in a espresso cup (€4), and shared some shrimp croquettes (€9) and a gorgeous lobster roll with nice chunks of lobster, lightly coated with a lemon mayo, and topped with some fresh green apple and shaved fennel (€16). Then we moved on to two very enjoyable fish dishes, gambas with Indian tomato curry, red onion, coriander, and naan bread (€19), followed by grilled octopus with garlic, chilli, and white beans (€19). .
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Brut de Mer is everything you hope a seafood restaurant/bar would be. Uncomplicated, well-prepared food, using good ingredients and served by friendly and knowledgeable staff (they know their oysters). The short wine list features a good selection of fish/seafood friendly wines at decent prices. Good seafood is surprisingly hard to come by in Amsterdam, but Brut de Mer gets it right.

Food: 7.5
Service: 8
Wine list: 7.5
#elizabethamsterdam

#review Whenever I’m craving seafood, Stork in Amsterdam is my go to place, but this time I wanted to try something new, so I went to Brut de Mer. Brut de Mer is a cozy seafood bar, opened on the lively Gerard Dou square in Amsterdam in 2015. I must have passed this place hundreds of times, always thinking I must go there soon.

So, there I was, lunch on a Friday afternoon in August, starting of with an oyster tasting (€39 for two). Brut de Mer offers a number of varieties, today including some fresh and salty Fine de Claire (Favier), creamy and round Les Jolies, meaty and beautifully sweet Cromane, very plump and vegetal Tsarskaya, fleshy and briny Imperatrice, and finally some lovely mineral, meaty, and gently sweet Gillardeau.

Next we each had a full-flavoured mini lobster bisque served in a espresso cup (€4), and shared some shrimp croquettes (€9) and a gorgeous lobster roll with nice chunks of lobster, lightly coated with a lemon mayo, and topped with some fresh green apple and shaved fennel (€16). Then we moved on to two very enjoyable fish dishes, gambas with Indian tomato curry, red onion, coriander, and naan bread (€19), followed by grilled octopus with garlic, chilli, and white beans (€19). .
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Brut de Mer is everything you hope a seafood restaurant/bar would be. Uncomplicated, well-prepared food, using good ingredients and served by friendly and knowledgeable staff (they know their oysters). The short wine list features a good selection of fish/seafood friendly wines at decent prices. Good seafood is surprisingly hard to come by in Amsterdam, but Brut de Mer gets it right.

Food: 7.5
Service: 8
Wine list: 7.5
#elizabethamsterdam

One of the highlights and biggest treats of my meal at the Schwarzwaldstube in Germany last week was this fawn aka kid deer (Geißkitz in German). One if the Schwarzwaldstube’s hunters had offered one to the restaurant 2 days prior (see the hunting form in photo 2 & 3). Yes, I ate bambi! It was expertly cooked with a thin juniper & herb crust, and served with plump cherries, celeriac puree, a celeriac “pasta sheet”, girolle mushrooms, and a beautifully reduced and shiny deer jus. Cooking of the highest level. #elizabethgermany #3michelinstars

One of the highlights and biggest treats of my meal at the Schwarzwaldstube in Germany last week was this fawn aka kid deer (Geißkitz in German). One if the Schwarzwaldstube’s hunters had offered one to the restaurant 2 days prior (see the hunting form in photo 2 & 3). Yes, I ate bambi! It was expertly cooked with a thin juniper & herb crust, and served with plump cherries, celeriac puree, a celeriac “pasta sheet”, girolle mushrooms, and a beautifully reduced and shiny deer jus. Cooking of the highest level. #elizabethgermany #3michelinstars

Mushroom compote topped with a soft egg yolk covered with a thin layer of mushroom jelly, and accompanied by dots of parsley puree, pan-fried (individually) cep mushrooms, girolle mushrooms and oyster mushrooms, and finished with a delicately creamy cep sauce flavoured with Vin Jaune (see previous posts & stories for more photographs of my meal at the Schwarzwaldstube) #elizabethgermany

Mushroom compote topped with a soft egg yolk covered with a thin layer of mushroom jelly, and accompanied by dots of parsley puree, pan-fried (individually) cep mushrooms, girolle mushrooms and oyster mushrooms, and finished with a delicately creamy cep sauce flavoured with Vin Jaune (see previous posts & stories for more photographs of my meal at the Schwarzwaldstube) #elizabethgermany

Photo 1: red mullet filled with basil leaves, served with a bouillabaisse sauce seasoned with a touch of vinegar, wilted spinach, crisp scales, and crisp garlic slivers (first poached in milk, therefore having a gentler flavour). Served on the side was a sauce made with the heads, thickened with the mullet’s liver, and topped with a basil mousse.

Photo 2: Marinated Faroe Islands salmon “Kishū”, smoked salmon, salmon jelly, salmon caviar, shimeji mushrooms, marinated cucumber, wasabi espuma, and shoyu vinaigrette. .
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Two exceptional plates of food executed with great skill and finesse.

The Schwarzwaldstube has held 3 Michelin stars since 1992, and the cooking has always has been of the highest level and the ingredients are world-class. However, compared to my last meal, which I scored 96/100 (review on my website), I would score this Schwarzwaldstube 2.0 meal 98/100*. My last visit to the Schwarzwaldstube was in May 2014, when Harold Wohlfart was still at the helm. Wohlfart left the Schwarzwaldstube (after almost 40 years) in 2017 and was succeeded by Torsten Michel (@torsten_michel), who had been with the Schwarzwaldstube since 2004, and he was Wohlfart’s head chef for many years. Succeeding a chef like Wohlfart is not the easiest of tasks, but I think Torsten Michel has done a brilliant job. Michel’s training is clearly visible on the plate, but if anything, today’s meal showed that he has put his own mark on it, and has reached a higher level of precision, focus and finesse. .
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More photographs to follow. #elizabethgermany *I was recognised

Photo 1: red mullet filled with basil leaves, served with a bouillabaisse sauce seasoned with a touch of vinegar, wilted spinach, crisp scales, and crisp garlic slivers (first poached in milk, therefore having a gentler flavour). Served on the side was a sauce made with the heads, thickened with the mullet’s liver, and topped with a basil mousse.

Photo 2: Marinated Faroe Islands salmon “Kishū”, smoked salmon, salmon jelly, salmon caviar, shimeji mushrooms, marinated cucumber, wasabi espuma, and shoyu vinaigrette. .
.
Two exceptional plates of food executed with great skill and finesse.

The Schwarzwaldstube has held 3 Michelin stars since 1992, and the cooking has always has been of the highest level and the ingredients are world-class. However, compared to my last meal, which I scored 96/100 (review on my website), I would score this Schwarzwaldstube 2.0 meal 98/100*. My last visit to the Schwarzwaldstube was in May 2014, when Harold Wohlfart was still at the helm. Wohlfart left the Schwarzwaldstube (after almost 40 years) in 2017 and was succeeded by Torsten Michel (@torsten_michel ), who had been with the Schwarzwaldstube since 2004, and he was Wohlfart’s head chef for many years. Succeeding a chef like Wohlfart is not the easiest of tasks, but I think Torsten Michel has done a brilliant job. Michel’s training is clearly visible on the plate, but if anything, today’s meal showed that he has put his own mark on it, and has reached a higher level of precision, focus and finesse. .
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More photographs to follow. #elizabethgermany *I was recognised

Scottish lobster with carrots (puree & pickled), passion fruit, “lobster sushi”, bonito vinaigrette, and lobster bisque - by 3-star chef @christianbau,  last night at a special dinner at Jan Sobecki’s 2-star @restauranttribeca in Heeze, the Netherlands. It was a very successful 4-hands dinner, the distinctive cooking styles of Bau and Sobecki complimented each other perfectly. Besides, it was great having Christian Bau over in the Netherlands. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, Christian Bau is the greatest chef of his generation, and arguebly (but not for me) the best chef in Europe. When it comes to high-end fine dining, Bau’s restaurant in Perl-Nennig, Germany, together with the Fat Duck in Bray in England, UK, are my favourite restaurants in the world. More in stories!

Scottish lobster with carrots (puree & pickled), passion fruit, “lobster sushi”, bonito vinaigrette, and lobster bisque - by 3-star chef @christianbau , last night at a special dinner at Jan Sobecki’s 2-star @restauranttribeca in Heeze, the Netherlands. It was a very successful 4-hands dinner, the distinctive cooking styles of Bau and Sobecki complimented each other perfectly. Besides, it was great having Christian Bau over in the Netherlands. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, Christian Bau is the greatest chef of his generation, and arguebly (but not for me) the best chef in Europe. When it comes to high-end fine dining, Bau’s restaurant in Perl-Nennig, Germany, together with the Fat Duck in Bray in England, UK, are my favourite restaurants in the world. More in stories!

The Chambertin was absolutely perfect, a truly great bottle. When I put my nose in the glass I was almost moved to tears by its sheer beauty. The Echézeaux was much more youthful than the Chambertin but more terse and linear in its expression, less opulent, but wonderfully transparent and precise; a great bottle too. .
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And the food wasn’t bad either 😉 We enjoyed these wines at Schwarzer Adler, that apart from being celebrated for its extraordinary wine list, has also held a Michelin star for 50 years! The cooking is classic, including “poulet en vessie” (chicken cooked in a bladder), or a classic roasted duck, but some of the seasonal à la carte dishes are more contemporary. See stories for photos of the food.

The Chambertin was absolutely perfect, a truly great bottle. When I put my nose in the glass I was almost moved to tears by its sheer beauty. The Echézeaux was much more youthful than the Chambertin but more terse and linear in its expression, less opulent, but wonderfully transparent and precise; a great bottle too. .
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And the food wasn’t bad either 😉 We enjoyed these wines at Schwarzer Adler, that apart from being celebrated for its extraordinary wine list, has also held a Michelin star for 50 years! The cooking is classic, including “poulet en vessie” (chicken cooked in a bladder), or a classic roasted duck, but some of the seasonal à la carte dishes are more contemporary. See stories for photos of the food.

In general restaurants in Amsterdam are fairly easy to book, meaning there’s no silliness like having to set your alarm clock to make a booking, or “we have a no reservation policy”, or perhaps the worst, places that are booked solid for months. So no drama, but at the same time the Amsterdam dining scene is pretty exciting right now with no shortage of restaurant openings.

New to the scene since February 2019 is Restaurant Watergang run by chef Tim van Grootheest (@tim1983adam) and sommelier/restaurant manager Mo Schuttel (@moschuttel). An appealing little restaurant offering a set seasonal menu (5 courses €49, veggie option available). Our meal started with a very good looking and perfectly seasoned tomato tartare topped with finely chopped cucumber, green pepper and a basil crème (photo in my timeline). Served on the side was warm brioche with homemade olive tapenade, offering a nice comforting contrast. Bursting with flavour was a dish of tender pulpo with a well-made romesco sauce, salsa verde & soft grilled red pepper, as well as a terrific clean-tasting peanut soup complemented by broad beans and celery crème. 
Main course was a perfectly moist piece of hake served with a bouillabaisse, fregola, and leek crème. A very satisfying combination of ingredients, the bouillabaisse having just the right touch of heat in the finish. I could eat this all day. Dessert was a poached wild peach filled with a light milk chocolate ganache, served with yoghurt ice cream, verbena foam, and rice crumble. Delightful.

Sommelier Mo Schuttel has put together a concise and well-priced wine list and offers excellent advice on food and wine pairings.

Needless to say, I had a fantastic meal at @restaurantwatergang. Uncluttered food singing with flavour. No fancy tricks here. To be honest, they had me with the tomato tartare, but seriously make sure you visit Watergang.

Food: 8
Service: 8
Wine list: 7.5
#elizabethamsterdam

In general restaurants in Amsterdam are fairly easy to book, meaning there’s no silliness like having to set your alarm clock to make a booking, or “we have a no reservation policy”, or perhaps the worst, places that are booked solid for months. So no drama, but at the same time the Amsterdam dining scene is pretty exciting right now with no shortage of restaurant openings.

New to the scene since February 2019 is Restaurant Watergang run by chef Tim van Grootheest (@tim1983adam ) and sommelier/restaurant manager Mo Schuttel (@moschuttel ). An appealing little restaurant offering a set seasonal menu (5 courses €49, veggie option available). Our meal started with a very good looking and perfectly seasoned tomato tartare topped with finely chopped cucumber, green pepper and a basil crème (photo in my timeline). Served on the side was warm brioche with homemade olive tapenade, offering a nice comforting contrast. Bursting with flavour was a dish of tender pulpo with a well-made romesco sauce, salsa verde & soft grilled red pepper, as well as a terrific clean-tasting peanut soup complemented by broad beans and celery crème.
Main course was a perfectly moist piece of hake served with a bouillabaisse, fregola, and leek crème. A very satisfying combination of ingredients, the bouillabaisse having just the right touch of heat in the finish. I could eat this all day. Dessert was a poached wild peach filled with a light milk chocolate ganache, served with yoghurt ice cream, verbena foam, and rice crumble. Delightful.

Sommelier Mo Schuttel has put together a concise and well-priced wine list and offers excellent advice on food and wine pairings.

Needless to say, I had a fantastic meal at @restaurantwatergang . Uncluttered food singing with flavour. No fancy tricks here. To be honest, they had me with the tomato tartare, but seriously make sure you visit Watergang.

Food: 8
Service: 8
Wine list: 7.5
#elizabethamsterdam

During my years as a blogger (2010-2018) I never got around to writing a review of long-running Michelin starred Vermeer in Amsterdam. On my blog I would have probably written a lengthy introduction because Vermeer is a restaurant with a long history dating back to the early nineties, but since this is Instagram, I don’t have room to go into details here. Executive chef since 2004 though, is British-born Chris Naylor (@chris.naylor) and during his entire career Vermeer has held one Michelin star.

The cooking at Vermeer today is modern and sophisticated with clever and original use of ingredients, particularly vegetables. A recent tasting menu* showed that Chris Naylor is a technically skilled and assured chef who delivers exciting food with great flavours, keeping you curious for the next course throughout the meal. * I was recognised 
Highlights included a cutting-edge dish of salt & apple-cured mackerel, served with a smooth and light puree of red pepper & mackerel, confit lemon, and a broth made with the mackerel’s heads served on the side. Or kohlrabi raviolo, crunchy fresh kohlrabi, langoustine and a soft quail’s egg, playfully paired with a carrot laksa. Best of all though, was an exceptional main course of perfectly tender summer roe deer, with a complex sauce of long pepper, sarawak peppercorns and allspice, served with broad beans, broad bean shell puree, and red currants.

The menu also included some smaller vegetarian dishes, like a fantastic beetroot mille-feuille with lemon verbena. Desserts were excellent, but not at the same level as the rest of the menu.

With some 800 bins the wine list at Vermeer is seriously impressive. A world-class wine list with world-class prices, but that’s to be expected a Michelin starred restaurant housed in a 5-star hotel (NH Barbizon Palace). Service was attentive and very knowledgeable about both food and wine.

Food: 8.5
Service: 8.5
Wine list: 8
#elizabethamsterdam

During my years as a blogger (2010-2018) I never got around to writing a review of long-running Michelin starred Vermeer in Amsterdam. On my blog I would have probably written a lengthy introduction because Vermeer is a restaurant with a long history dating back to the early nineties, but since this is Instagram, I don’t have room to go into details here. Executive chef since 2004 though, is British-born Chris Naylor (@chris.naylor ) and during his entire career Vermeer has held one Michelin star.

The cooking at Vermeer today is modern and sophisticated with clever and original use of ingredients, particularly vegetables. A recent tasting menu* showed that Chris Naylor is a technically skilled and assured chef who delivers exciting food with great flavours, keeping you curious for the next course throughout the meal. * I was recognised
Highlights included a cutting-edge dish of salt & apple-cured mackerel, served with a smooth and light puree of red pepper & mackerel, confit lemon, and a broth made with the mackerel’s heads served on the side. Or kohlrabi raviolo, crunchy fresh kohlrabi, langoustine and a soft quail’s egg, playfully paired with a carrot laksa. Best of all though, was an exceptional main course of perfectly tender summer roe deer, with a complex sauce of long pepper, sarawak peppercorns and allspice, served with broad beans, broad bean shell puree, and red currants.

The menu also included some smaller vegetarian dishes, like a fantastic beetroot mille-feuille with lemon verbena. Desserts were excellent, but not at the same level as the rest of the menu.

With some 800 bins the wine list at Vermeer is seriously impressive. A world-class wine list with world-class prices, but that’s to be expected a Michelin starred restaurant housed in a 5-star hotel (NH Barbizon Palace). Service was attentive and very knowledgeable about both food and wine.

Food: 8.5
Service: 8.5
Wine list: 8
#elizabethamsterdam

Wonderfully fresh and punchy gamba tiradito with vineyard peach aka blood peach, avocado, Peruvian corn, and habanada pepper, earlier this week @ the recently opened and playfully named Sjefietshe restaurant (@sjefietshe) in Amsterdam, which specialises in ceviche, Sjefietshe being the slightly slangy Dutch pronunciation of ceviche. 
Tiradito is a Japanese-Peruvian (Nikkei cuisine) ceviche-style dish with raw sliced fish. .
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I only had a quick bite at Sjefietshe this time, but I’ll be back for a full meal soon! (More in stories)

Wonderfully fresh and punchy gamba tiradito with vineyard peach aka blood peach, avocado, Peruvian corn, and habanada pepper, earlier this week @ the recently opened and playfully named Sjefietshe restaurant (@sjefietshe ) in Amsterdam, which specialises in ceviche, Sjefietshe being the slightly slangy Dutch pronunciation of ceviche.
Tiradito is a Japanese-Peruvian (Nikkei cuisine) ceviche-style dish with raw sliced fish. .
.
I only had a quick bite at Sjefietshe this time, but I’ll be back for a full meal soon! (More in stories)

The prettiest little elderflower custard tarts with sea buckthorn meringue @ BAK in Amsterdam #elizabethamsterdam

The prettiest little elderflower custard tarts with sea buckthorn meringue @ BAK in Amsterdam #elizabethamsterdam

Girolle mushrooms wrapped with Swiss chard, carrot puree, Jerusalem artichoke flowers, fermented turnip juice, and roasted yeast oil. A beautifully delicate dish, the roast yeast offering lovely subtle nutty notes. .
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My last review of BAK is from 2014. long time followers on here know I’ve had many a meal at BAK since. They’re cooking has evolved so much since 2014, so a new review is seriously due. Will publish one here soon. #elizabethamsterdam

Girolle mushrooms wrapped with Swiss chard, carrot puree, Jerusalem artichoke flowers, fermented turnip juice, and roasted yeast oil. A beautifully delicate dish, the roast yeast offering lovely subtle nutty notes. .
.
My last review of BAK is from 2014. long time followers on here know I’ve had many a meal at BAK since. They’re cooking has evolved so much since 2014, so a new review is seriously due. Will publish one here soon. #elizabethamsterdam

Like everyone, I do enjoy a good sandwich and one of my all time favourites is a classic Filet Américain Sandwich or “Broodje Filet” in Dutch. On average I have 3 Broodjes Filet a week, and it’s the sandwich I crave most when away from home. In a way, Filet Américain or Préparé in Flemish, is similar to a steak tartare, the main difference being that Filet Américain has a mayonnaise based seasoning, which gives it a creamier finish. Apart from mayonnaise the seasoning often includes tomato ketchup, mustard and Worcester sauce, and some Flemish recipes also include chopped capers, gherkins or onions. As with all classic recipes, there are many, many, many ways of making them, and each Dutch butcher or delicatessen will have their own recipe. Having gone through tons of the stuff since childhood, I consider myself a Filet Américain aficionado. Whenever I visit a new butcher, I always take home a tub of Filet Américain. You can judge a good butcher by the quality of its Filet Américain. Family-run butcher shop Slagerij van Dam in Amsterdam (est. 1960) sells an excellent Filet Américain. You can buy some at their shop or enjoy a sandwich at their brasserie down the road, as I did last week. I ordered a double. It’s served on a simple crusty roll (as it should be!) and it comes with chopped onions and capers. It doesn’t look like much, but believe me this was absolutely delicious.

For my Dutch followers: what’s your favourite Filet Américain in Amsterdam? Or in the Netherlands? .
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(ps special 🏆emoji  for first person to comment on the rocket 😉)

Like everyone, I do enjoy a good sandwich and one of my all time favourites is a classic Filet Américain Sandwich or “Broodje Filet” in Dutch. On average I have 3 Broodjes Filet a week, and it’s the sandwich I crave most when away from home. In a way, Filet Américain or Préparé in Flemish, is similar to a steak tartare, the main difference being that Filet Américain has a mayonnaise based seasoning, which gives it a creamier finish. Apart from mayonnaise the seasoning often includes tomato ketchup, mustard and Worcester sauce, and some Flemish recipes also include chopped capers, gherkins or onions. As with all classic recipes, there are many, many, many ways of making them, and each Dutch butcher or delicatessen will have their own recipe. Having gone through tons of the stuff since childhood, I consider myself a Filet Américain aficionado. Whenever I visit a new butcher, I always take home a tub of Filet Américain. You can judge a good butcher by the quality of its Filet Américain. Family-run butcher shop Slagerij van Dam in Amsterdam (est. 1960) sells an excellent Filet Américain. You can buy some at their shop or enjoy a sandwich at their brasserie down the road, as I did last week. I ordered a double. It’s served on a simple crusty roll (as it should be!) and it comes with chopped onions and capers. It doesn’t look like much, but believe me this was absolutely delicious.

For my Dutch followers: what’s your favourite Filet Américain in Amsterdam? Or in the Netherlands? .
.
(ps special 🏆emoji for first person to comment on the rocket 😉)

Miso black cod @ Taiko restaurant at Conservatorium hotel in Amsterdam #elizabethamsterdam

Miso black cod @ Taiko restaurant at Conservatorium hotel in Amsterdam #elizabethamsterdam

Since 2016 restaurant De School has been (rather fittingly) occupying an old car work shop space in a former secondary mechanic school in Amsterdam, a building that also houses a club, a gallery, and a gym. The dining room is light and spacious, with a canteen-like feel, but there are tablecloths, which makes the room warm and welcoming. 
De School is yet another fine example of what is so exciting about casual dining in Amsterdam these days. The cooking is honest and creative, with well thought out dishes, attractive flavours, and original use of ingredients. The seasonal set menu is priced at €37.50 for 3 courses, €47.50 for 5, and €55 for 7 (incl. cheese), which is very fair considering the quality of the cooking. Equally fair-priced is the wine list, which focuses on natural/biodynamic wines, and features countless interesting wines and some real bargains e.g. Bandol rosé from Domaine Tempier for €50 (€27.50 retail). And there’s also a separate “special bottles’ list.

But back to the food. The 5-course menu on a recent visit kicked off with a clever dish of white beetroot, peas (fresh & puree), Robiola cheese, peach and dill dressing. Next up was a cucumber “veloute” with chanterelles, rye crumbs, lardo and fresh herbs. Two stand-out dishes followed. Brill was wonderfully paired with crunchy fennel, mussels, mussel juice & curry beurre blanc, aubergine and quinoa. Veal was served with a sweet potato puree, pickled baby corn, crunchy corn, and a mildly spicy green chilli jus. Dessert didn’t disappoint either: cherry pit ice cream with oatmeal crumbs, verbena meringue, blueberry crème suisse, and preserved plums. There was a 2nd dessert (this may have been complimentary) of a gorgeous warm chocolate mousse, fig jam, fresh fig, fig leaf ice cream, and chocolate crumbs.

Service was genuinely friendly and efficient. De School is not to be missed.

Food: 8
Service: 8
Winelist: 8
#elizabethamsterdam

Since 2016 restaurant De School has been (rather fittingly) occupying an old car work shop space in a former secondary mechanic school in Amsterdam, a building that also houses a club, a gallery, and a gym. The dining room is light and spacious, with a canteen-like feel, but there are tablecloths, which makes the room warm and welcoming.
De School is yet another fine example of what is so exciting about casual dining in Amsterdam these days. The cooking is honest and creative, with well thought out dishes, attractive flavours, and original use of ingredients. The seasonal set menu is priced at €37.50 for 3 courses, €47.50 for 5, and €55 for 7 (incl. cheese), which is very fair considering the quality of the cooking. Equally fair-priced is the wine list, which focuses on natural/biodynamic wines, and features countless interesting wines and some real bargains e.g. Bandol rosé from Domaine Tempier for €50 (€27.50 retail). And there’s also a separate “special bottles’ list.

But back to the food. The 5-course menu on a recent visit kicked off with a clever dish of white beetroot, peas (fresh & puree), Robiola cheese, peach and dill dressing. Next up was a cucumber “veloute” with chanterelles, rye crumbs, lardo and fresh herbs. Two stand-out dishes followed. Brill was wonderfully paired with crunchy fennel, mussels, mussel juice & curry beurre blanc, aubergine and quinoa. Veal was served with a sweet potato puree, pickled baby corn, crunchy corn, and a mildly spicy green chilli jus. Dessert didn’t disappoint either: cherry pit ice cream with oatmeal crumbs, verbena meringue, blueberry crème suisse, and preserved plums. There was a 2nd dessert (this may have been complimentary) of a gorgeous warm chocolate mousse, fig jam, fresh fig, fig leaf ice cream, and chocolate crumbs.

Service was genuinely friendly and efficient. De School is not to be missed.

Food: 8
Service: 8
Winelist: 8
#elizabethamsterdam

Wild peach filled with a light milk chocolate ganache, yoghurt ice cream, verbena foam, and rice crumble #elizabethamsterdam

Wild peach filled with a light milk chocolate ganache, yoghurt ice cream, verbena foam, and rice crumble #elizabethamsterdam

Tomato tartare topped with a mixture of finely chopped cucumber and green pepper, and basil crème #elizabethamsterdam

Tomato tartare topped with a mixture of finely chopped cucumber and green pepper, and basil crème #elizabethamsterdam

Restaurant De Wilde Zwijnen (Wild Boars) has been a steady fixture on the Amsterdam restaurant scene since 2010. The kitchen is run by Frenky van Dinther (@frenkyvd), who also oversees the menu of the Wilde Zwijnen food bar next door (since 2015). In the evening they offer an a la carte menu (starters ± €10, mains €20-25) or a set chef’s menu (from €33.75 for 3 courses). At lunchtime they offer a small menu with egg dishes and sandwiches, and a set lunch menu (from €24.25 for 2 courses). We ordered the 3-course lunch menu (€28.25) and requested them to include the blackboard special as an extra course. In the end we paid €77.25 for two for lunch (excluding drinks), and a delightful lunch it was too.

First to arrive was charred sea bass with pearl barley seasoned with dill, lovage mayo, thinly sliced fennel, cucumber juice, and runner beans. Fresh, clean, elegant, as was the next (extra) course of plaice with langoustine, lentils, leek, romanesco and langoustine foam. Main course was a pleasing combination of veal (including a little homemade veal sausage), celeriac “bitterbal” yellow carrot, buttered cabbage, butter beans, peas, pea puree and jus de veau.  Dessert was a lovely combination of fresh plump cherries, cherry foam flavoured with Kirsch, hazelnut cake & crumble, and caramel ice cream.

De Wilde Zwijnen is an enthusiastically run, laid-back restaurant that offers modern Dutch cuisine with good ingredients. Dishes are carefully cooked with flavours ranging from pleasingly hearty to clean and light. The wine list is compact but well-considered and the mark-ups are sensible, especially considering the excellent value of the menus. The set lunch menu is one of the best lunch deals in town.

Food: 7.5
Service:  8 (excellent wine service too)
Wine list: 7
#elizabethamsterdam

Restaurant De Wilde Zwijnen (Wild Boars) has been a steady fixture on the Amsterdam restaurant scene since 2010. The kitchen is run by Frenky van Dinther (@frenkyvd ), who also oversees the menu of the Wilde Zwijnen food bar next door (since 2015). In the evening they offer an a la carte menu (starters ± €10, mains €20-25) or a set chef’s menu (from €33.75 for 3 courses). At lunchtime they offer a small menu with egg dishes and sandwiches, and a set lunch menu (from €24.25 for 2 courses). We ordered the 3-course lunch menu (€28.25) and requested them to include the blackboard special as an extra course. In the end we paid €77.25 for two for lunch (excluding drinks), and a delightful lunch it was too.

First to arrive was charred sea bass with pearl barley seasoned with dill, lovage mayo, thinly sliced fennel, cucumber juice, and runner beans. Fresh, clean, elegant, as was the next (extra) course of plaice with langoustine, lentils, leek, romanesco and langoustine foam. Main course was a pleasing combination of veal (including a little homemade veal sausage), celeriac “bitterbal” yellow carrot, buttered cabbage, butter beans, peas, pea puree and jus de veau. Dessert was a lovely combination of fresh plump cherries, cherry foam flavoured with Kirsch, hazelnut cake & crumble, and caramel ice cream.

De Wilde Zwijnen is an enthusiastically run, laid-back restaurant that offers modern Dutch cuisine with good ingredients. Dishes are carefully cooked with flavours ranging from pleasingly hearty to clean and light. The wine list is compact but well-considered and the mark-ups are sensible, especially considering the excellent value of the menus. The set lunch menu is one of the best lunch deals in town.

Food: 7.5
Service: 8 (excellent wine service too)
Wine list: 7
#elizabethamsterdam

Beautiful piece of plancha cooked sea bass with grilled little gem, a light lettuce puree, samphire, cockles, complemented by a foamy pea, mint and yoghurt sauce #elizabethamsterdam #1michelinstar

Beautiful piece of plancha cooked sea bass with grilled little gem, a light lettuce puree, samphire, cockles, complemented by a foamy pea, mint and yoghurt sauce #elizabethamsterdam #1michelinstar

Oysters, gooseberries (preserved & puree), oyster cream, tonka bean gazpacho jelly, and thinly sliced courgette #elizabethamsterdam #1michelinstar

Oysters, gooseberries (preserved & puree), oyster cream, tonka bean gazpacho jelly, and thinly sliced courgette #elizabethamsterdam #1michelinstar

Ok, here’s another Amsterdam burger review. I tried two hamburgers last week, the classic “Geflipt” burger at Geflipt (Dutch for flipped) and the “Royale with Cheese” at Rotisserie (Amsterdam West branch). I’ve also decided to introduce a simple 5-point scoring system for burgers. Here goes.

Hitting all the right notes was the Royale with Cheese at @rotisserieamsterdam, a double-stack burger smashed style, with cheddar, lettuce, tomato, pickles, and burger sauce, served on a grilled soft bun. Tender and juicy patties, cooked a la plancha, so with good colour all over (good old Maillard), and the seasoning was faultless. Excellent bun too, soft and melting and it didn’t fall apart. A marvellously tasty affair. Yes, this is a burger done right and I’ve been craving another one ever since. (score: 5/5)

The Geflipt burger comes with with a large patty (180gr) of Gasconne beef, bacon, cheddar, homemade onion compote, and Geflipt’s signature fried egg. A pretty burger, cooked medium, although unfortunately arriving in two halves (we said we’d share), and the meat was packed to tight, resulting in a patty that was moist but not juicy. In addition, the patty was quite heavily seasoned with, I’m guessing salt, pepper, onion and tomato, a seasoning mixture you often find in Dutch ready-made burgers. Personally, I’m not a huge fan of this seasoning because it overpowers the flavour of the meat. I know, very subjective, but I prefer a simple seasoning of salt and a little bit of pepper. Overall it wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t great either. (score: 2/5)
#elizabethamsterdam

Ok, here’s another Amsterdam burger review. I tried two hamburgers last week, the classic “Geflipt” burger at Geflipt (Dutch for flipped) and the “Royale with Cheese” at Rotisserie (Amsterdam West branch). I’ve also decided to introduce a simple 5-point scoring system for burgers. Here goes.

Hitting all the right notes was the Royale with Cheese at @rotisserieamsterdam , a double-stack burger smashed style, with cheddar, lettuce, tomato, pickles, and burger sauce, served on a grilled soft bun. Tender and juicy patties, cooked a la plancha, so with good colour all over (good old Maillard), and the seasoning was faultless. Excellent bun too, soft and melting and it didn’t fall apart. A marvellously tasty affair. Yes, this is a burger done right and I’ve been craving another one ever since. (score: 5/5)

The Geflipt burger comes with with a large patty (180gr) of Gasconne beef, bacon, cheddar, homemade onion compote, and Geflipt’s signature fried egg. A pretty burger, cooked medium, although unfortunately arriving in two halves (we said we’d share), and the meat was packed to tight, resulting in a patty that was moist but not juicy. In addition, the patty was quite heavily seasoned with, I’m guessing salt, pepper, onion and tomato, a seasoning mixture you often find in Dutch ready-made burgers. Personally, I’m not a huge fan of this seasoning because it overpowers the flavour of the meat. I know, very subjective, but I prefer a simple seasoning of salt and a little bit of pepper. Overall it wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t great either. (score: 2/5)
#elizabethamsterdam

Choux has been part of a restaurant movement that has redefined dining in Amsterdam, a casual dining movement that started around 2013, with restaurants like Rijsel, Gebr. Hartering and Ron Gastrobar, and was joined Daalder, BAK and Choux later on.

I first reviewed @chouxrestaurant in November 2015 (score: 90/100), in the year of the opening, and I have been back a number of times since. My recent meal at Choux (5 courses €52*) shows that the restaurant is on top form. *I was recognised. .
.
Chef @merijnvberlo and sommelier @figovanonna, and their respective teams, know what they’re doing and they’re doing it incredibly well. There are many interesting finds on the gradually growing wine list, including a good number of grower champagnes. It has a focus on (well made!) natural wine and it matches the cuisine perfectly. The cuisine is dedicated to the beauty of the season, which, in August, translates into a fresh and floral starter of peas, white currants (fresh & granita), and a codium vinaigrette. As well as a creative dish of plaice, cooked on the bone, with courgette spaghetti, pistachios, chanterelles, green beans, an a stellar creamy confit bergamot sauce. Or an outstanding main course of fillet of roe deer, roe deer steak haché, red orache, smoked Hollandaise, preserved magnolia, polenta croquettes, and roe deer-meadowsweet jus. As was a vegetarian dish of shallots with a creamy koji & horseradish sauce (see my timeline for more details) and a gorgeous blueberry, mud cake, white chocolate-woodruff crème, black currant, and sorrel ice cream dessert. I couldn’t just pick one winner; this was a top-quality meal on all accounts.

Over the years Choux has become a true ambassador for modern Dutch cuisine, not to mention vegetarian cuisine, because Choux illustrates convincingly that vegetable cooking in Amsterdam is, with Copenhagen, among the most creative in Europe.

Food: 9
Service: 9
Wine list: 8.5
#elizabethamsterdam

Choux has been part of a restaurant movement that has redefined dining in Amsterdam, a casual dining movement that started around 2013, with restaurants like Rijsel, Gebr. Hartering and Ron Gastrobar, and was joined Daalder, BAK and Choux later on.

I first reviewed @chouxrestaurant in November 2015 (score: 90/100), in the year of the opening, and I have been back a number of times since. My recent meal at Choux (5 courses €52*) shows that the restaurant is on top form. *I was recognised. .
.
Chef @merijnvberlo and sommelier @figovanonna , and their respective teams, know what they’re doing and they’re doing it incredibly well. There are many interesting finds on the gradually growing wine list, including a good number of grower champagnes. It has a focus on (well made!) natural wine and it matches the cuisine perfectly. The cuisine is dedicated to the beauty of the season, which, in August, translates into a fresh and floral starter of peas, white currants (fresh & granita), and a codium vinaigrette. As well as a creative dish of plaice, cooked on the bone, with courgette spaghetti, pistachios, chanterelles, green beans, an a stellar creamy confit bergamot sauce. Or an outstanding main course of fillet of roe deer, roe deer steak haché, red orache, smoked Hollandaise, preserved magnolia, polenta croquettes, and roe deer-meadowsweet jus. As was a vegetarian dish of shallots with a creamy koji & horseradish sauce (see my timeline for more details) and a gorgeous blueberry, mud cake, white chocolate-woodruff crème, black currant, and sorrel ice cream dessert. I couldn’t just pick one winner; this was a top-quality meal on all accounts.

Over the years Choux has become a true ambassador for modern Dutch cuisine, not to mention vegetarian cuisine, because Choux illustrates convincingly that vegetable cooking in Amsterdam is, with Copenhagen, among the most creative in Europe.

Food: 9
Service: 9
Wine list: 8.5
#elizabethamsterdam

Had a stupendously good meal at Choux in Amsterdam last week. Will publish my review in the next couple of days. In the meantime, here is one of the many highlights: shallots, outer shells cooked in beer, honey and pear vinegar, and the core used to fill these individual shells together with preserved gooseberries, and toasted barley. All this is garnished with nasturtium leaves and flowers, and served with a creamy sauce seasoned with koji and horseradish. A beautiful combination of flavours and textures, the nasturtium leaves & flowers visually lifting the dish but also adding extra flavour and contrast. Great sauce too, with subtle funky notes from the koji and the horseradish coming through in the finish. Vegetable cooking doesn’t get much better than this.
#elizabethamsterdam

Had a stupendously good meal at Choux in Amsterdam last week. Will publish my review in the next couple of days. In the meantime, here is one of the many highlights: shallots, outer shells cooked in beer, honey and pear vinegar, and the core used to fill these individual shells together with preserved gooseberries, and toasted barley. All this is garnished with nasturtium leaves and flowers, and served with a creamy sauce seasoned with koji and horseradish. A beautiful combination of flavours and textures, the nasturtium leaves & flowers visually lifting the dish but also adding extra flavour and contrast. Great sauce too, with subtle funky notes from the koji and the horseradish coming through in the finish. Vegetable cooking doesn’t get much better than this.
#elizabethamsterdam