National Geographic

National Geographic

@natgeo

Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

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Video by Joel Sartore @joelsartore | This nocturnal tree-dweller is an endangered horned marsupial frog at El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center (@amphibianrescue). Ecuador, where this frog is found,  is a known hot spot for amphibian biodiversity; at least 589 species live within its borders, with new discoveries reported each year. To see a still of another horned frog species, follow me @joelsartore. #hornedfrog #marsupialfrog #amphibian #photoark #savetogether

Video by Joel Sartore @joelsartore | This nocturnal tree-dweller is an endangered horned marsupial frog at El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center (@amphibianrescue ). Ecuador, where this frog is found, is a known hot spot for amphibian biodiversity; at least 589 species live within its borders, with new discoveries reported each year. To see a still of another horned frog species, follow me @joelsartore . #hornedfrog #marsupialfrog #amphibian #photoark #savetogether

Photo by @williamodaniels | Displaced women and children in Boda, Central African Republic, in 2014. Mostly from the Fula ethnic group, more than 11,000 have sought refuge in this city, as the country has been in the throes of civil war since 2013. In 2014 the UN Development Programme rated the country as the second least developed country in the world. Follow me on @williamodaniels for more human stories.

Photo by @williamodaniels | Displaced women and children in Boda, Central African Republic, in 2014. Mostly from the Fula ethnic group, more than 11,000 have sought refuge in this city, as the country has been in the throes of civil war since 2013. In 2014 the UN Development Programme rated the country as the second least developed country in the world. Follow me on @williamodaniels for more human stories.

Photo by @ismailferdous | The Sundarbans area is indisputably the largest mangrove forest on Earth, and it lies in the world's biggest river delta, formed by the convergence of the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna Rivers in the Bay of Bengal. This national forest spreads across 3,861 square miles in  Bangladesh and India (60%  in Bangladesh), and it's home to many rare and globally endangered wildlife species, such as the royal Bengal tiger. In two major ways, the Sundarbans is being impacted by climate change: first, the sea level is rising,  flooding lands with each high tide. When the tide retreats, the land is left more saline than before—and less able to grow crops. The same goes for the brackish creeks and river mouths dotting the forests. The second consequence: more big cyclones. Higher seas give the cyclone winds greater velocity, and the area has been hit by catastrophic cyclones in the previous years. #climatechange #royalbengaltiger

Photo by @ismailferdous | The Sundarbans area is indisputably the largest mangrove forest on Earth, and it lies in the world's biggest river delta, formed by the convergence of the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Meghna Rivers in the Bay of Bengal. This national forest spreads across 3,861 square miles in Bangladesh and India (60% in Bangladesh), and it's home to many rare and globally endangered wildlife species, such as the royal Bengal tiger. In two major ways, the Sundarbans is being impacted by climate change: first, the sea level is rising, flooding lands with each high tide. When the tide retreats, the land is left more saline than before—and less able to grow crops. The same goes for the brackish creeks and river mouths dotting the forests. The second consequence: more big cyclones. Higher seas give the cyclone winds greater velocity, and the area has been hit by catastrophic cyclones in the previous years. #climatechange #royalbengaltiger

Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio I An outtake from the story I’ve been doing about new archaeology in Jerusalem for the December issue of @natgeo. Remnants of concrete trenches can still be found in the undergrowth on Mount Zion, just outside the city walls of Jerusalem. Between 1948 and 1967, when the Old City was under Jordanian rule, most of Mount Zion was a designated no-man's land between Israel and Jordan, and these trenches allowed Israeli soldiers to resupply their front line at the top of the hill. For more on this project follow @simonnorfolkstudio #jerusalem #archaeology #oldcityofjerusalem #mtzion #trench

Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio I An outtake from the story I’ve been doing about new archaeology in Jerusalem for the December issue of @natgeo . Remnants of concrete trenches can still be found in the undergrowth on Mount Zion, just outside the city walls of Jerusalem. Between 1948 and 1967, when the Old City was under Jordanian rule, most of Mount Zion was a designated no-man's land between Israel and Jordan, and these trenches allowed Israeli soldiers to resupply their front line at the top of the hill. For more on this project follow @simonnorfolkstudio #jerusalem #archaeology #oldcityofjerusalem #mtzion #trench

Photos by @michaelchristopherbrown | Palestinian children in Balata Refugee Camp, the largest refugee camp in the West Bank. Balata has a population of 30,000 residents in a .25-square-kilometer area, the majority of whom are under age 25. In 1950 the UN gave these refugees, originally from Jaffa, shelter in this tiny area near Nablus, which is now densely populated. The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, which last year was subject to hundreds of millions of dollars in budget cuts by the Trump administration, funds a school in the Balata camp with approximately 5,000 pupils. Other programs include the Yaffa Cultural Center, which operates a guesthouse, children’s theater and cinema, children’s library and media center, but with the budget cuts, it's seeking donors to fund the center. From 1980s through the early 2000s, Balata residents played a leading role in the first and second intifadas.

Photos by @michaelchristopherbrown | Palestinian children in Balata Refugee Camp, the largest refugee camp in the West Bank. Balata has a population of 30,000 residents in a .25-square-kilometer area, the majority of whom are under age 25. In 1950 the UN gave these refugees, originally from Jaffa, shelter in this tiny area near Nablus, which is now densely populated. The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, which last year was subject to hundreds of millions of dollars in budget cuts by the Trump administration, funds a school in the Balata camp with approximately 5,000 pupils. Other programs include the Yaffa Cultural Center, which operates a guesthouse, children’s theater and cinema, children’s library and media center, but with the budget cuts, it's seeking donors to fund the center. From 1980s through the early 2000s, Balata residents played a leading role in the first and second intifadas.

Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | Sunrise in Pucusana, a vibrant artisanal fishing port on the Peruvian coast. To view more of our world from above, follow @geosteinmetz.

Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | Sunrise in Pucusana, a vibrant artisanal fishing port on the Peruvian coast. To view more of our world from above, follow @geosteinmetz .

Photo by @ronan_donovan | A six-week-old wild arctic wolf pup peeks at a motion-triggered camera from behind her father’s leg, on the remote Canadian island known in the Inuktitut language as Umingmak Nuna, meaning "land of musk oxen.” In just a few weeks, this young pup will outgrow den life and start to follow the adults into the unknown. She will begin to learn about her vast home range and the sights and smells that will become her life for years to come. She will learn from her parents how to survive in this harsh environment, and eventually how to hunt the mighty musk oxen. To see more images of arctic wolves visit @ronan_donovan

Photo by @ronan_donovan | A six-week-old wild arctic wolf pup peeks at a motion-triggered camera from behind her father’s leg, on the remote Canadian island known in the Inuktitut language as Umingmak Nuna, meaning "land of musk oxen.” In just a few weeks, this young pup will outgrow den life and start to follow the adults into the unknown. She will begin to learn about her vast home range and the sights and smells that will become her life for years to come. She will learn from her parents how to survive in this harsh environment, and eventually how to hunt the mighty musk oxen. To see more images of arctic wolves visit @ronan_donovan

Photo by Anastasia Taylor-Lind @anastasiatl | Anna Dedova, 75, is at the grave of her son, who accidentally killed himself last year when he opened a hand grenade found near his home in the village of Opytne. This visit is a rare chance for her: The graveyard is mined, and civilians are not allowed to enter.  Opytne is situated close to the front line in what's called the "grey zone." During the active phase of the war, locals often had to bury their family members who died, or were killed by shelling, in their backyards. Later, they began cooperating with soldiers. A coffin would be placed in a military truck, and relatives were left to hope that they could find the grave later. This summer, for the first time in five years, local activists managed to organize a visit to the Opytne cemetery for those whose relatives are buried here. They secured a relatively safe path to the graves, but cemetery has become so overgrown that people struggled to find the crosses and gravestones marking their loved ones. They hurried to cut the grass and re-establish basic order—who knows when they will next have the chance to come back. Words by Alisa Sopova @sopova.alisa.  #5kfromthefrontline is an ongoing project about the everyday consequences of the war in eastern Ukraine.

Photo by Anastasia Taylor-Lind @anastasiatl | Anna Dedova, 75, is at the grave of her son, who accidentally killed himself last year when he opened a hand grenade found near his home in the village of Opytne. This visit is a rare chance for her: The graveyard is mined, and civilians are not allowed to enter. Opytne is situated close to the front line in what's called the "grey zone." During the active phase of the war, locals often had to bury their family members who died, or were killed by shelling, in their backyards. Later, they began cooperating with soldiers. A coffin would be placed in a military truck, and relatives were left to hope that they could find the grave later. This summer, for the first time in five years, local activists managed to organize a visit to the Opytne cemetery for those whose relatives are buried here. They secured a relatively safe path to the graves, but cemetery has become so overgrown that people struggled to find the crosses and gravestones marking their loved ones. They hurried to cut the grass and re-establish basic order—who knows when they will next have the chance to come back. Words by Alisa Sopova @sopova.alisa . #5kfromthefrontline is an ongoing project about the everyday consequences of the war in eastern Ukraine.

Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | With a long exposure, a quiver tree (kokerboom) stands tall under a sky of streaked stars. These trees are well suited to arid places with severe heat and low precipitation, due to an ability to store water within their trunks. They’re part of the aloe family, and have long been used for medicinal purposes. Photographed in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa. To see more photos of this beautiful part of the world please visit @ladzinski

Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | With a long exposure, a quiver tree (kokerboom) stands tall under a sky of streaked stars. These trees are well suited to arid places with severe heat and low precipitation, due to an ability to store water within their trunks. They’re part of the aloe family, and have long been used for medicinal purposes. Photographed in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa. To see more photos of this beautiful part of the world please visit @ladzinski

Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @Mitty | Did you know that in Hawaiian culture when a baby is born the umbilical cord is buried in the sand along with a tree seedling? This practice serves as a reminder of the connection that new person has not only to his or her parents but also to their ancestors and to the land. When a Hawaiian dies, the entire community, their ohana, paddles out and returns their ashes to the sea. This cultural connection to land and sea runs deep in the veins of native Hawaiians. The concept of Aloha ʻĀina, “love of the land,” is central in Hawaiian life and key to understanding their stewardship of the Earth. If you look at a mountain and all you see is a pile of rocks, you may have a hard time understanding why anyone would fight to protect it. For the Kānaki Ōiwi people, Mauna Kea is not just a mountain: it represents their ancestral ties to creation, a sacred site revered through their history and very much worthy of respect and protection. Follow me @Mitty for more stories that reflect upon the ways world cultures and nature are tied to one another. #kukiaimauna #wearemaunakea #culture #blackandwhitephotography

Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @Mitty | Did you know that in Hawaiian culture when a baby is born the umbilical cord is buried in the sand along with a tree seedling? This practice serves as a reminder of the connection that new person has not only to his or her parents but also to their ancestors and to the land. When a Hawaiian dies, the entire community, their ohana, paddles out and returns their ashes to the sea. This cultural connection to land and sea runs deep in the veins of native Hawaiians. The concept of Aloha ʻĀina, “love of the land,” is central in Hawaiian life and key to understanding their stewardship of the Earth. If you look at a mountain and all you see is a pile of rocks, you may have a hard time understanding why anyone would fight to protect it. For the Kānaki Ōiwi people, Mauna Kea is not just a mountain: it represents their ancestral ties to creation, a sacred site revered through their history and very much worthy of respect and protection. Follow me @Mitty for more stories that reflect upon the ways world cultures and nature are tied to one another. #kukiaimauna #wearemaunakea #culture #blackandwhitephotography

Photo by @jodicobbphoto | Heartbreaking floods in Venice yesterday, with 85% of the city under water up to six feet deep. Mayor Brugnaro said the city was "on its knees." I made this image of receding floodwaters in St. Mark's Square in 2008 during another record flood. #venice #acquaalta

Photo by @jodicobbphoto | Heartbreaking floods in Venice yesterday, with 85% of the city under water up to six feet deep. Mayor Brugnaro said the city was "on its knees." I made this image of receding floodwaters in St. Mark's Square in 2008 during another record flood. #venice #acquaalta

Photos by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | My first trip to Cedar Mesa was over 30 years ago. It was January, and I made the long drive to Utah from Tennessee, spending a frigid week in Grand Gulch, where I marveled at the canyon, the archaeology, and the artwork. Thirty years later this place has still captured my heart and imagination. It’s a privilege to be back here working on an @insidenatgeo grant about ancient artwork contained in eight western national monuments that have been studied for reduction by the Department of the Interior. Perhaps the greatest privilege is working with representatives of @protectbearsears in their ancestral home. For more images from this and other projects follow me @salvarezphoto and my nonprofit @ancientartarchive as we preserve humanity’s oldest stories.

Photos by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | My first trip to Cedar Mesa was over 30 years ago. It was January, and I made the long drive to Utah from Tennessee, spending a frigid week in Grand Gulch, where I marveled at the canyon, the archaeology, and the artwork. Thirty years later this place has still captured my heart and imagination. It’s a privilege to be back here working on an @insidenatgeo grant about ancient artwork contained in eight western national monuments that have been studied for reduction by the Department of the Interior. Perhaps the greatest privilege is working with representatives of @protectbearsears in their ancestral home. For more images from this and other projects follow me @salvarezphoto and my nonprofit @ancientartarchive as we preserve humanity’s oldest stories.