NASA

NASA

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Our scientists launched rockets from the top of the world! 🌎🚀 In the tiny Arctic town of Ny-Ålesund, where polar bears outnumber people, winter means three months without sunlight. The unending darkness is ideal for those who seek a strange breed of northern lights, normally obscured by daylight. When these unusual auroras shine, Earth’s atmosphere leaks into space.  Our scientists traveled to Ny-Ålesund to launch rockets through these auroras and witness oxygen particles right in the middle of their escape. Piercing these fleeting auroras, some 300 miles high, would require strategy, patience — and a fair bit of luck. This was our VISIONS-2 mission, and this is their story.  VISIONS-2 was just the first of many. Over the coming months, rocket teams from all over the world will launch rockets into this region as part of the Grand Challenge Initiative—Cusp, an international collaboration to study the mysteries of the polar atmosphere.  Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/VISIONS2blog  #nasa #space #rocketscience #rocketlaunch #science

Our scientists launched rockets from the top of the world! 🌎🚀 In the tiny Arctic town of Ny-Ålesund, where polar bears outnumber people, winter means three months without sunlight. The unending darkness is ideal for those who seek a strange breed of northern lights, normally obscured by daylight. When these unusual auroras shine, Earth’s atmosphere leaks into space. Our scientists traveled to Ny-Ålesund to launch rockets through these auroras and witness oxygen particles right in the middle of their escape. Piercing these fleeting auroras, some 300 miles high, would require strategy, patience — and a fair bit of luck. This was our VISIONS-2 mission, and this is their story. VISIONS-2 was just the first of many. Over the coming months, rocket teams from all over the world will launch rockets into this region as part of the Grand Challenge Initiative—Cusp, an international collaboration to study the mysteries of the polar atmosphere. Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/VISIONS2blog #nasa #space #rocketscience #rocketlaunch #science

5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0... Lift-off! 🚀 ⛈️ 50 years ago, Apollo 12 launched into a dark and rainy morning sky. ⁣ ⁣ With Apollo 12 at about 6,600 feet altitude, observers on the ground saw lightning striking the launch pad. The Saturn V rocket was unaffected and continued to operate normally. But in Mission Control, data on controllers’ displays turned garbled. Luckily, a quick-thinking flight controller, John Aaron, had a fix. The crew onboard the spacecraft reset an obscure system, and data returned to the screens in Mission Control. Once Apollo 12 mission commander Pete Conrad understood the cause of the excitement, he radioed to Houston, “I think we need to do a little more all-weather testing.” ⁣ ⁣ Five days later on Nov. 19, 1969, the Apollo 12 lunar module Intrepid landed on the Moon in a region called the Ocean of Storms, approximately 950 miles west of where Apollo 11 landed and only 535 feet from our robotic Surveyor III mission.⁣ ⁣ Images Credit: NASA⁣ ⁣ #apollo #apollo12 #launch #rocket #nasa #history #saturnv

5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0... Lift-off! 🚀 ⛈️ 50 years ago, Apollo 12 launched into a dark and rainy morning sky. ⁣ ⁣ With Apollo 12 at about 6,600 feet altitude, observers on the ground saw lightning striking the launch pad. The Saturn V rocket was unaffected and continued to operate normally. But in Mission Control, data on controllers’ displays turned garbled. Luckily, a quick-thinking flight controller, John Aaron, had a fix. The crew onboard the spacecraft reset an obscure system, and data returned to the screens in Mission Control. Once Apollo 12 mission commander Pete Conrad understood the cause of the excitement, he radioed to Houston, “I think we need to do a little more all-weather testing.” ⁣ ⁣ Five days later on Nov. 19, 1969, the Apollo 12 lunar module Intrepid landed on the Moon in a region called the Ocean of Storms, approximately 950 miles west of where Apollo 11 landed and only 535 feet from our robotic Surveyor III mission.⁣ ⁣ Images Credit: NASA⁣ ⁣ #apollo #apollo12 #launch #rocket #nasa #history #saturnv

Tiny planet Mercury transits the Sun 👀⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ On Nov. 11, Mercury crossed between Earth and the Sun - a rare event we won't be able to see again until 2032. Our Solar Dynamics Observatory, which views the Sun in a variety of wavelengths of light in the extreme ultraviolet, tracked Mercury's journey.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ #sun #transit #mercury #mercurytransit #solarsystem #nasa

Tiny planet Mercury transits the Sun 👀⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ On Nov. 11, Mercury crossed between Earth and the Sun - a rare event we won't be able to see again until 2032. Our Solar Dynamics Observatory, which views the Sun in a variety of wavelengths of light in the extreme ultraviolet, tracked Mercury's journey.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ #sun #transit #mercury #mercurytransit #solarsystem #nasa

There’s a storm brewing in the solar system! 🌩️⁣ ⁣ Our @NASAJuno spacecraft captured this stunningly detailed look at a cyclonic storm in Jupiter's atmosphere during its 23rd close flyby of the planet. ⁣ ⁣ Juno observed this vortex in a region of Jupiter called the “north north north north temperate belt,” one of the gas giant planet’s many persistent cloud bands. These bands are formed by the prevailing winds at different latitudes. The vortex seen here is roughly 1,200 miles (2,000 kilometers) wide.⁣ ⁣ Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager when the spacecraft was about 5,300 miles (8,500 kilometers) from Jupiter’s cloud tops above a latitude of about 49 degrees. ⁣  Image credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS⁣ Image processing by Kevin M. Gill, © CC BY⁣ ⁣ #nasa #jupiter #solarsystem #swirls #clouds

There’s a storm brewing in the solar system! 🌩️⁣ ⁣ Our @NASAJuno spacecraft captured this stunningly detailed look at a cyclonic storm in Jupiter's atmosphere during its 23rd close flyby of the planet. ⁣ ⁣ Juno observed this vortex in a region of Jupiter called the “north north north north temperate belt,” one of the gas giant planet’s many persistent cloud bands. These bands are formed by the prevailing winds at different latitudes. The vortex seen here is roughly 1,200 miles (2,000 kilometers) wide.⁣ ⁣ Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager when the spacecraft was about 5,300 miles (8,500 kilometers) from Jupiter’s cloud tops above a latitude of about 49 degrees. ⁣ Image credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS⁣ Image processing by Kevin M. Gill, © CC BY⁣ ⁣ #nasa #jupiter #solarsystem #swirls #clouds

✨“We are made of star-stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.”✨ Today we remember planetary scientist Carl Sagan on his birthday. ⁣ ⁣ Within a galaxy hosting around 300 billion stars, here @NASAHubble has captured a mere handful or two. These stars fall within NGC 1333, located about 1,000 light-years away in the constellation of Perseus. The cool gas and dust concentrated in this region is generating new stars whose light is then reflecting off the surrounding material, lighting it up and making this object’s lingering presence known to us.⁣ ⁣ #nasa #hubble #space #stars #astronomy #carlsaganday

✨“We are made of star-stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.”✨ Today we remember planetary scientist Carl Sagan on his birthday. ⁣ ⁣ Within a galaxy hosting around 300 billion stars, here @NASAHubble has captured a mere handful or two. These stars fall within NGC 1333, located about 1,000 light-years away in the constellation of Perseus. The cool gas and dust concentrated in this region is generating new stars whose light is then reflecting off the surrounding material, lighting it up and making this object’s lingering presence known to us.⁣ ⁣ #nasa #hubble #space #stars #astronomy #carlsaganday

The "intricate, mesmerizing patterns of the International Space Station (@ISS) solar arrays." ☀️⁣ ⁣ The second image here is a close-up taken by @Astro_Jessica on Nov. 7 during a photo survey of the arrays, which convert solar energy to electrical power. ⁣ ⁣ In the space station's orbit 220 miles above Earth, the best source of energy is sunlight. When the station is in the Sun, about 60 percent of the electricity collected by its solar arrays is used to charge the station's batteries. The batteries then provide power to the station's systems during nighttime passes around Earth. ⁣ ⁣ Images Credit: NASA⁣ ⁣ #spacestation #solarpower #sun #solarcells #nasa #iss

The "intricate, mesmerizing patterns of the International Space Station (@ISS ) solar arrays." ☀️⁣ ⁣ The second image here is a close-up taken by @Astro_Jessica on Nov. 7 during a photo survey of the arrays, which convert solar energy to electrical power. ⁣ ⁣ In the space station's orbit 220 miles above Earth, the best source of energy is sunlight. When the station is in the Sun, about 60 percent of the electricity collected by its solar arrays is used to charge the station's batteries. The batteries then provide power to the station's systems during nighttime passes around Earth. ⁣ ⁣ Images Credit: NASA⁣ ⁣ #spacestation #solarpower #sun #solarcells #nasa #iss

The glow of the Milky Way arcs across a sea of stars... and planets! 🌌⁣ ⁣ This panorama of the southern sky was created with 208 images from a year of observations by our Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. Swipe through the images to see TESS's discoveries: first, the host stars of 29 confirmed exoplanets (worlds beyond our solar system), and second, more than 1,000 candidate planets astronomers are now investigating. ⁣ ⁣ To find exoplanets, the four TESS cameras capture a full sector of the sky every 30 minutes to search for transits. Transits occur when a planet passes in front of its host star from our perspective, briefly and regularly dimming its light. ⁣ ⁣ Images Credit: NASA/MIT/TESS and Ethan Kruse (USRA)⁣ ⁣ #milkyway #nightsky #panorama #exoplanets #stars

The glow of the Milky Way arcs across a sea of stars... and planets! 🌌⁣ ⁣ This panorama of the southern sky was created with 208 images from a year of observations by our Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission. Swipe through the images to see TESS's discoveries: first, the host stars of 29 confirmed exoplanets (worlds beyond our solar system), and second, more than 1,000 candidate planets astronomers are now investigating. ⁣ ⁣ To find exoplanets, the four TESS cameras capture a full sector of the sky every 30 minutes to search for transits. Transits occur when a planet passes in front of its host star from our perspective, briefly and regularly dimming its light. ⁣ ⁣ Images Credit: NASA/MIT/TESS and Ethan Kruse (USRA)⁣ ⁣ #milkyway #nightsky #panorama #exoplanets #stars

Not all galaxies are lonely. Some have galaxy squads. ⁣ ⁣ NGC 1706, captured in this image by @NASAHubble, belongs to something known as a galaxy group, which is just as the name suggests — a group of up to 50 galaxies which are gravitationally bound and relatively close to each other. ⁣ ⁣ Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, has its own squad — known as the Local Group, which also contains the Andromeda galaxy, the Large and Small Magellanic clouds and the Triangulum galaxy. Click the link in the bio for more info ⬆️⁣ ⁣ Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Bellini et al.⁣ #galaxy #squadgoals #hubble #cosmos #universe

Not all galaxies are lonely. Some have galaxy squads. ⁣ ⁣ NGC 1706, captured in this image by @NASAHubble , belongs to something known as a galaxy group, which is just as the name suggests — a group of up to 50 galaxies which are gravitationally bound and relatively close to each other. ⁣ ⁣ Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, has its own squad — known as the Local Group, which also contains the Andromeda galaxy, the Large and Small Magellanic clouds and the Triangulum galaxy. Click the link in the bio for more info ⬆️⁣ ⁣ Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Bellini et al.⁣ #galaxy #squadgoals #hubble #cosmos #universe

Waving goodbye to a spacecraft. 👋  Astronaut Christina Koch used the robotic arm on the International Space Station (@ISS) to release Japan's "Kounotori" HTV cargo ship on Nov. 1, after it spent 34 days attached to the station's Harmony module. ⁣ ⁣ Launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan on Sept. 24, Kounotori, meaning “white stork” in Japanese, delivered about five tons of supplies and science experiments as well as new lithium-ion batteries to the station. ⁣ ⁣ "Gone but not forgotten!," wrote Koch. "Watching the HTV cargo ship depart Space Station⁣ today and remembering the complex dance of the robotic arm that marked the beginning of its stay." ⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA⁣ ⁣ #spaceship #spacestation #sunrise #jaxa #goodbye

Waving goodbye to a spacecraft. 👋 Astronaut Christina Koch used the robotic arm on the International Space Station (@ISS ) to release Japan's "Kounotori" HTV cargo ship on Nov. 1, after it spent 34 days attached to the station's Harmony module. ⁣ ⁣ Launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan on Sept. 24, Kounotori, meaning “white stork” in Japanese, delivered about five tons of supplies and science experiments as well as new lithium-ion batteries to the station. ⁣ ⁣ "Gone but not forgotten!," wrote Koch. "Watching the HTV cargo ship depart Space Station⁣ today and remembering the complex dance of the robotic arm that marked the beginning of its stay." ⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA⁣ ⁣ #spaceship #spacestation #sunrise #jaxa #goodbye

Cue a jaw-drop😮⁣ ⁣ Behold, our beautiful planet Earth in all its natural splendor, captured from 250 miles above by the International Space Station (@ISS) commander Luca Parmitano. ⁣ ⁣ As you read this, six humans are orbiting planet Earth at 17,500 mph in a football-field sized microgravity laboratory. During their time on the space station, they conduct important science and research that not only benefits life here on Earth, but will eventually help us send humans deeper into the solar system than ever before.⁣ ⁣ Credit: @EuropeanSpaceAgency / Luca Parmitano⁣

Cue a jaw-drop😮⁣ ⁣ Behold, our beautiful planet Earth in all its natural splendor, captured from 250 miles above by the International Space Station (@ISS ) commander Luca Parmitano. ⁣ ⁣ As you read this, six humans are orbiting planet Earth at 17,500 mph in a football-field sized microgravity laboratory. During their time on the space station, they conduct important science and research that not only benefits life here on Earth, but will eventually help us send humans deeper into the solar system than ever before.⁣ ⁣ Credit: @EuropeanSpaceAgency / Luca Parmitano⁣

3…2…1… LAUNCH! 🚀 Today at @NASAWallops Flight Facility in Virginia, we launched more than 8,200 pounds of science, supplies and hardware to crew members living and working aboard the International Space Station.⁣ ⁣ At 9:59 a.m. EDT, @NorthropGrumman's #antares rocket, with #cygnus spacecraft onboard, lifted off our home planet as the @ISS was traveling over the south Atlantic southwest of Cape Town, South Africa, at an altitude of 257 statute miles. ⁣ ⁣ Along for the ride are research investigations, hardware for future spacewalks and a vest intended to protect astronauts from harmful radiation in space and other cargo that is scheduled to arrive at our orbiting laboratory on Monday, Nov. 4. ⁣⁣ Images Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)⁣ ⁣ #nasa #rocketlaunch #outofthisworld #wallopsisland #spacestation⁣ #launchphotography

3…2…1… LAUNCH! 🚀 Today at @NASAWallops Flight Facility in Virginia, we launched more than 8,200 pounds of science, supplies and hardware to crew members living and working aboard the International Space Station.⁣ ⁣ At 9:59 a.m. EDT, @NorthropGrumman 's #antares rocket, with #cygnus spacecraft onboard, lifted off our home planet as the @ISS was traveling over the south Atlantic southwest of Cape Town, South Africa, at an altitude of 257 statute miles. ⁣ ⁣ Along for the ride are research investigations, hardware for future spacewalks and a vest intended to protect astronauts from harmful radiation in space and other cargo that is scheduled to arrive at our orbiting laboratory on Monday, Nov. 4. ⁣⁣ Images Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)⁣ ⁣ #nasa #rocketlaunch #outofthisworld #wallopsisland #spacestation#launchphotography

It takes more than a candle to light this cosmic pumpkin. 🎃  In this infrared image from our @NASA_Spitzer Space Telescope, a massive star in the center of a cloud of dust and gas creates what researchers have nicknamed the "Jack-o-lantern Nebula." ⁣ ⁣ Powerful outflows of radiation and particles from a massive star — known as an O-type star and about 15 to 20 times heavier than the Sun — has likely swept the surrounding dust and gas outward, creating deep gouges in the cloud.  The red wavelength is more pronounced in this high-contrast image, highlighting contours in the dust as well as the densest regions of the nebula, which appear brightest. ⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech⁣ ⁣ #halloween #spitzerspacetelescope #cosmic #pumpkin #jackolantern #nebula⁣

It takes more than a candle to light this cosmic pumpkin. 🎃 In this infrared image from our @NASA_Spitzer Space Telescope, a massive star in the center of a cloud of dust and gas creates what researchers have nicknamed the "Jack-o-lantern Nebula." ⁣ ⁣ Powerful outflows of radiation and particles from a massive star — known as an O-type star and about 15 to 20 times heavier than the Sun — has likely swept the surrounding dust and gas outward, creating deep gouges in the cloud. The red wavelength is more pronounced in this high-contrast image, highlighting contours in the dust as well as the densest regions of the nebula, which appear brightest. ⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech⁣ ⁣ #halloween #spitzerspacetelescope #cosmic #pumpkin #jackolantern #nebula

They did the Monster Mash… in SPACE! 👻🎃💫 ⁣ ⁣ Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopev, European Space Agency astronaut Alex Gerst and NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor posed for a Halloween photo on the @iss in 2018.⁣ ⁣ If you have a stellar space-themed Halloween costume, share your photos with us using #nasacostume ⁣ #nasa #space #halloween #spooky

They did the Monster Mash… in SPACE! 👻🎃💫 ⁣ ⁣ Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopev, European Space Agency astronaut Alex Gerst and NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor posed for a Halloween photo on the @iss in 2018.⁣ ⁣ If you have a stellar space-themed Halloween costume, share your photos with us using #nasacostume#nasa #space #halloween #spooky

It's a Galaxy of Horrors! 😱  These new posters that were produced by our Exoplanet Exploration Program Office reveal the sinister science behind real worlds we've discovered in our own galaxy.  Visit our link in bio (💀if you're brave enough💀) to download these new posters for free and learn more about extreme exoplanets. 🌚  Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

It's a Galaxy of Horrors! 😱 These new posters that were produced by our Exoplanet Exploration Program Office reveal the sinister science behind real worlds we've discovered in our own galaxy. Visit our link in bio (💀if you're brave enough💀) to download these new posters for free and learn more about extreme exoplanets. 🌚 Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

👀 When we peer deep into space, we don't expect to find something staring back at us...⁣ ⁣ This galactic ghoul, captured by our Hubble Space Telescope, is actually a titanic head-on collision between two galaxies. Each "eye" is the bright core of a galaxy, one of which slammed into another. The outline of the face is a ring of young blue stars. Other clumps of new stars form a nose and mouth. ⁣ ⁣ Although galaxy collisions are common most of them are not head-on smashups like this Arp-Madore system. Get spooked and find out what lies inside this ghostly apparition from the link in our bio. ⁣ ⁣ #halloween #spooky #space #galaxies #nasa #facesinplaces

👀 When we peer deep into space, we don't expect to find something staring back at us...⁣ ⁣ This galactic ghoul, captured by our Hubble Space Telescope, is actually a titanic head-on collision between two galaxies. Each "eye" is the bright core of a galaxy, one of which slammed into another. The outline of the face is a ring of young blue stars. Other clumps of new stars form a nose and mouth. ⁣ ⁣ Although galaxy collisions are common most of them are not head-on smashups like this Arp-Madore system. Get spooked and find out what lies inside this ghostly apparition from the link in our bio. ⁣ ⁣ #halloween #spooky #space #galaxies #nasa #facesinplaces

No, that’s not a fiery jack-o’-lantern 🔥🎃. It’s the Sun! ⁣ ⁣ Our Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this ultraviolet image in October 2014, showing active regions on our home star. The active regions in this image appear brighter because those are areas that emit more light and energy. They are markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona. ⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/SDO⁣ ⁣ #nasa #space #halloween19 #halloween #pumpkin

No, that’s not a fiery jack-o’-lantern 🔥🎃. It’s the Sun! ⁣ ⁣ Our Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this ultraviolet image in October 2014, showing active regions on our home star. The active regions in this image appear brighter because those are areas that emit more light and energy. They are markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona. ⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/SDO⁣ ⁣ #nasa #space #halloween19 #halloween #pumpkin

🧭 Explorer, 📸 photographer, ⛰️ geologist, 🧪 chemist... Mars Curiosity does it all!⁣ ⁣ The rover captured images on Oct. 11 for this celebratory #selfie, after its second-ever "wet chemistry" experiment using solvents to help its portable laboratory detect certain carbon-based molecules important to the formation of life, called organic compounds. ⁣ ⁣ About 984 feet (300 meters) behind the rover is Vera Rubin Ridge, which Curiosity departed nearly a year ago. Beyond the ridge, you can see the floor of Gale Crater and the crater's northern rim. Curiosity has been ascending Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-tall (5-kilometer-tall) mountain inside the crater.⁣ ⁣ The individual images in this selfie were taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), a camera on the end of the rover's robotic arm. The images are stitched together into a panorama; the robotic arm isn't visible in the parts of the images used in the composite.⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS⁣ ⁣ #mars #rover #solarsystem #nasa #chemistry #robots

🧭 Explorer, 📸 photographer, ⛰️ geologist, 🧪 chemist... Mars Curiosity does it all!⁣ ⁣ The rover captured images on Oct. 11 for this celebratory #selfie , after its second-ever "wet chemistry" experiment using solvents to help its portable laboratory detect certain carbon-based molecules important to the formation of life, called organic compounds. ⁣ ⁣ About 984 feet (300 meters) behind the rover is Vera Rubin Ridge, which Curiosity departed nearly a year ago. Beyond the ridge, you can see the floor of Gale Crater and the crater's northern rim. Curiosity has been ascending Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-tall (5-kilometer-tall) mountain inside the crater.⁣ ⁣ The individual images in this selfie were taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), a camera on the end of the rover's robotic arm. The images are stitched together into a panorama; the robotic arm isn't visible in the parts of the images used in the composite.⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS⁣ ⁣ #mars #rover #solarsystem #nasa #chemistry #robots

“That's here. That's home. That's us.” – Carl Sagan  Seeing Earth from space can alter an astronauts’ cosmic perspective, a mental shift known as the “Overview Effect.” First coined by space writer Frank White in 1987, the Overview Effect is described as a feeling of awe for our home planet and a sense of responsibility for taking care of it.  See Earth from the vantage point of our astronauts in these perspective-changing views.  Credit: NASA  #nasa #space #science #earth

“That's here. That's home. That's us.” – Carl Sagan Seeing Earth from space can alter an astronauts’ cosmic perspective, a mental shift known as the “Overview Effect.” First coined by space writer Frank White in 1987, the Overview Effect is described as a feeling of awe for our home planet and a sense of responsibility for taking care of it. See Earth from the vantage point of our astronauts in these perspective-changing views. Credit: NASA #nasa #space #science #earth

A trail of night lights ✨ ✨ ✨  This image compiles over 400 time-lapse photos taken by @astro_christina from the International Space Station (@ISS), as the station traveled from Namibia toward the Red Sea on July 5, 2019.⁣ ⁣ Here, stationary features like cities appear as pale yellow-white dotted streaks; many of the thinner dotted lines with darker orange hues are seasonal fires burning. Northward, you can see bright white lightning flashes from thunderstorms and above the horizon, a faint green-yellow tracing of the upper atmosphere known as airglow.⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA⁣ Caption: Andrea Meado, Jacobs Technology⁣ ⁣ #startrails #stars #space #airglow #timelapse #nasa⁣

A trail of night lights ✨ ✨ ✨ This image compiles over 400 time-lapse photos taken by @astro_christina from the International Space Station (@ISS ), as the station traveled from Namibia toward the Red Sea on July 5, 2019.⁣ ⁣ Here, stationary features like cities appear as pale yellow-white dotted streaks; many of the thinner dotted lines with darker orange hues are seasonal fires burning. Northward, you can see bright white lightning flashes from thunderstorms and above the horizon, a faint green-yellow tracing of the upper atmosphere known as airglow.⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA⁣ Caption: Andrea Meado, Jacobs Technology⁣ ⁣ #startrails #stars #space #airglow #timelapse #nasa

⭐ ➡️💥 A Chandra supernova in the sky... This Chandra X-ray Observatory (@nasachandraxray) image captures a star in the constellation Cassiopeia that was obliterated by an explosion. What's left behind is this multicolored, three-dimensional object: a supernova remnant. ⁣ ⁣ Tycho's supernova remnant — named for Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, among the first to spot it in 1572 — was a Type Ia, which occurs when a white dwarf star pulls material from, or merges with, a nearby companion star until a violent explosion is triggered, sending debris hurtling into space.⁣ ⁣ The image is providing clues to what caused the remnant's intriguing pattern of bright clumps and fainter areas. To emphasize the clumps in the image and the three-dimensional nature of Tycho, scientists selected two narrow ranges of X-ray energies to isolate material (silicon, colored red) moving away from Earth, and moving towards us (also silicon, colored blue). The other colors in the image (yellow, green, blue-green, orange and purple) show a broad range of different energies and elements, and a mixture of directions of motion. ⁣ Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/RIKEN & GSFC/T. Sato et al; Optical: DSS⁣ ⁣ #supernova #explosion #cosmos #universe #observatory

⭐ ➡️💥 A Chandra supernova in the sky... This Chandra X-ray Observatory (@nasachandraxray ) image captures a star in the constellation Cassiopeia that was obliterated by an explosion. What's left behind is this multicolored, three-dimensional object: a supernova remnant. ⁣ ⁣ Tycho's supernova remnant — named for Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, among the first to spot it in 1572 — was a Type Ia, which occurs when a white dwarf star pulls material from, or merges with, a nearby companion star until a violent explosion is triggered, sending debris hurtling into space.⁣ ⁣ The image is providing clues to what caused the remnant's intriguing pattern of bright clumps and fainter areas. To emphasize the clumps in the image and the three-dimensional nature of Tycho, scientists selected two narrow ranges of X-ray energies to isolate material (silicon, colored red) moving away from Earth, and moving towards us (also silicon, colored blue). The other colors in the image (yellow, green, blue-green, orange and purple) show a broad range of different energies and elements, and a mixture of directions of motion. ⁣ Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/RIKEN & GSFC/T. Sato et al; Optical: DSS⁣ ⁣ #supernova #explosion #cosmos #universe #observatory

“To all those reaching to new heights: yes you can.” 👩‍🚀💪 #mondaymotivation brought to you by @Astro_Christina.  On Oct 18, our @NASAAstronauts Christina Koch (in the suit with red stripes) and Jessica Meir performed the first #allwomanspacewalk in history. They replaced a faulty battery charge/discharge unit that failed to activate after a previous spacewalk.  This was the fourth spacewalk for @Astro_Christina and the first for @Astro_Jessica. Their tasks set the stage for our #artemis missions where history will be made once again when the first woman steps foot on the Moon.  Credit: NASA

“To all those reaching to new heights: yes you can.” 👩‍🚀💪 #mondaymotivation brought to you by @Astro_Christina . On Oct 18, our @NASAAstronauts Christina Koch (in the suit with red stripes) and Jessica Meir performed the first #allwomanspacewalk in history. They replaced a faulty battery charge/discharge unit that failed to activate after a previous spacewalk. This was the fourth spacewalk for @Astro_Christina and the first for @Astro_Jessica . Their tasks set the stage for our #artemis missions where history will be made once again when the first woman steps foot on the Moon. Credit: NASA

Saturn on Insta vs. Saturn IRL 👀⁣ ⁣ An illusion of perspective, Saturn’s moon Tethys seems to hang above the planet's north pole in this view from @NASAJPL's Cassini spacecraft that was captured on Jan. 26, 2015. Tethys is actually farther away than Saturn in this image. Lacking visual clues about distance, our brains place the moon above Saturn's north pole, but like all of Saturn's major moons and its ring system, Tethys actually orbits almost exactly at the planet’s equator.⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute⁣ ⁣ #nasa #nasacassini #saturn #moon #space #planet #photography

Saturn on Insta vs. Saturn IRL 👀⁣ ⁣ An illusion of perspective, Saturn’s moon Tethys seems to hang above the planet's north pole in this view from @NASAJPL 's Cassini spacecraft that was captured on Jan. 26, 2015. Tethys is actually farther away than Saturn in this image. Lacking visual clues about distance, our brains place the moon above Saturn's north pole, but like all of Saturn's major moons and its ring system, Tethys actually orbits almost exactly at the planet’s equator.⁣ ⁣ Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute⁣ ⁣ #nasa #nasacassini #saturn #moon #space #planet #photography

"Look at the stars, look how they shine for you" 🤩⁣ ⁣ @NASAHubble took this image of galaxy NGC 4380, with a colossal collection of stars numbering up to the hundreds of billions. Galaxies like this one are quite common in the universe! Graceful spiral arms outlined by dark lanes of dust wind around the bulging core, which glows brightly and has the highest concentration of stars in the galaxy.⁣ ⁣ #stars #hubble #cosmos #galaxy #starry⁣ ⁣ Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency)⁣ Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, P. Erwin

"Look at the stars, look how they shine for you" 🤩⁣ ⁣ @NASAHubble took this image of galaxy NGC 4380, with a colossal collection of stars numbering up to the hundreds of billions. Galaxies like this one are quite common in the universe! Graceful spiral arms outlined by dark lanes of dust wind around the bulging core, which glows brightly and has the highest concentration of stars in the galaxy.⁣ ⁣ #stars #hubble #cosmos #galaxy #starry ⁣ ⁣ Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency)⁣ Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, P. Erwin